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Title: Interfaces for knowledge-base builders control knowledge and application-specific procedures

Abstract

Expert System Environment/VM is an expert system shell-a general-purpose system for constructing and executing expert system applications. An application expert has both factual knowledge about an application and knowledge about how that factual knowledge should be organized and processed. In addition, many applications require application-dependent procedures to access databases or to do specialized processing. An important and novel part of Expert System Environment/VM is the technique used to allow the expert or knowledge-base builder to enter the control knowledge and to interface with application-dependent procedures. This paper discusses these high-level interfaces for the knowledge-base builder.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5627648
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: IBM J. Res. Dev.; (United States); Journal Volume: 30:1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; EXPERT SYSTEMS; PROGRAMMING; ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE; DATA BASE MANAGEMENT; DATA PROCESSING; MAN-MACHINE SYSTEMS; MANAGEMENT; PROCESSING; 990200* - Mathematics & Computers

Citation Formats

Hirsch, P., Katke, W., Meier, M., Snyder, S., and Stillman, R. Interfaces for knowledge-base builders control knowledge and application-specific procedures. United States: N. p., 1986. Web. doi:10.1147/rd.301.0029.
Hirsch, P., Katke, W., Meier, M., Snyder, S., & Stillman, R. Interfaces for knowledge-base builders control knowledge and application-specific procedures. United States. doi:10.1147/rd.301.0029.
Hirsch, P., Katke, W., Meier, M., Snyder, S., and Stillman, R. Wed . "Interfaces for knowledge-base builders control knowledge and application-specific procedures". United States. doi:10.1147/rd.301.0029.
@article{osti_5627648,
title = {Interfaces for knowledge-base builders control knowledge and application-specific procedures},
author = {Hirsch, P. and Katke, W. and Meier, M. and Snyder, S. and Stillman, R.},
abstractNote = {Expert System Environment/VM is an expert system shell-a general-purpose system for constructing and executing expert system applications. An application expert has both factual knowledge about an application and knowledge about how that factual knowledge should be organized and processed. In addition, many applications require application-dependent procedures to access databases or to do specialized processing. An important and novel part of Expert System Environment/VM is the technique used to allow the expert or knowledge-base builder to enter the control knowledge and to interface with application-dependent procedures. This paper discusses these high-level interfaces for the knowledge-base builder.},
doi = {10.1147/rd.301.0029},
journal = {IBM J. Res. Dev.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 30:1,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1986},
month = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1986}
}
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