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Title: Factors influencing nesting success of burrowing owls in southeastern Idaho

Abstract

A burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia) population nesting on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in southeastern Idaho utilized burrows excavated by badgers (Taxidea taxus) or natural cavities in lava flows as nesting sites. The size of the population was small (N = 13-14 pairs) in relation to the number of available nesting sites, suggesting that factors other than burrow availability limited this population. Rodents and Jerusalem crickets (Stenopelmatus fuscus) represented the primary prey utilized during the nesting season. This population demonstrated both a numerical (brood size) and functional (dietary) response to a decrease in the density of three species of rodents on the INEL during a drought in 1977. 11 references, 1 figure, 2 table.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Idaho, Moscow
OSTI Identifier:
5610013
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Great Basin Nat.; (United States); Journal Volume: 45:1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; BIRDS; POPULATION DYNAMICS; CLIMATES; DIET; HABITAT; IDAHO; POPULATION DENSITY; PREDATOR-PREY INTERACTIONS; ANIMALS; FEDERAL REGION X; NORTH AMERICA; USA; VERTEBRATES 550100* -- Behavioral Biology

Citation Formats

Gleason, R.S., and Johnson, D.R. Factors influencing nesting success of burrowing owls in southeastern Idaho. United States: N. p., 1985. Web.
Gleason, R.S., & Johnson, D.R. Factors influencing nesting success of burrowing owls in southeastern Idaho. United States.
Gleason, R.S., and Johnson, D.R. 1985. "Factors influencing nesting success of burrowing owls in southeastern Idaho". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5610013,
title = {Factors influencing nesting success of burrowing owls in southeastern Idaho},
author = {Gleason, R.S. and Johnson, D.R.},
abstractNote = {A burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia) population nesting on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in southeastern Idaho utilized burrows excavated by badgers (Taxidea taxus) or natural cavities in lava flows as nesting sites. The size of the population was small (N = 13-14 pairs) in relation to the number of available nesting sites, suggesting that factors other than burrow availability limited this population. Rodents and Jerusalem crickets (Stenopelmatus fuscus) represented the primary prey utilized during the nesting season. This population demonstrated both a numerical (brood size) and functional (dietary) response to a decrease in the density of three species of rodents on the INEL during a drought in 1977. 11 references, 1 figure, 2 table.},
doi = {},
journal = {Great Basin Nat.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 45:1,
place = {United States},
year = 1985,
month = 1
}
  • Food habits of a population of the Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia) at the Idaho National Engineering Labortory, Butte County, were studied. The 421 pellets examined yielded 2,436 prey items of at least 22 prey species. Invertebrates, largely insects, constituted 91 percent of the total prey items, but only 29 percent of the total biomass; mammals constituted 8 percent of the prey items, but 68 percent of the biomass. The prey were mostly nocturnal species; diurnal species were poorly represented.
  • Location and monitoring of Hooded-Warbler nests in a bottomland forest and examined the effects of edge proximity, edge type and nest-site vegetation on nesting success. Probability of parasitism by Brown-headed cowbirds was higher near clearcut edges and parasitism reduced clutch-size and numbers of fledglings per successful nest. Study was conducted in a primarily forested landscape, so cowbird abundance or negative edge effects may have been low relative to agricultural landscapes in the South.
  • Nesting ecology and reproduction of painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) in southeast Michigan were intensively studied from 1975 to 1978. The average clutch size of Michigan painted turtles was 7.55, with body size accounting for only 9-13% of the variance. Data on nesting frequency indicate that from 30 to 50% of the females possibly do not reproduce every year and that approx.6% reproduce twice in a given year. Predation within 48 h of egg-laying is responsible for the failure of 20% of the nests. An additional 12% nest failure is due to various other causes. These data substantially alter the lifemore » table previously reported for this population of painted turtles.« less
  • Nesting ecology and reproduction of painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) in southeast Michigan were intensively studied from 1975 to 1978. The average clutch size of Michigan painted turtles was 7.55, with body size accounting for only 9-13% of the variance. Data on nesting frequency indicate that from 30 to 50% of the females possibly do not reproduce every year and that approx. =6% reproduce twice in a given year. Predation within 48 h of egg-laying is responsible for the failure of 20% of the nests. An additional 12% nest failure is due to various other causes. These data substantially alter themore » life table previously reported in this population of painted turtles.« less
  • Excrement sample and livers of juvenile great blue herons were collected at nests at three widely separated colonies along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River to test the validity of using excrement samples as indicators of metal concentrations in tissues of juvenile herons fed food collected by parent birds within a few kilometers of nests. There was no positive relation noted between metal concentrations in excrement and liver samples taken from the same nests. Statistically significant differences in metal concentrations were noted in excrement samples collected among the different heron colonies. Arsenic, Cd, Cr, and Pb concentrations (dry wt.)more » were higher in excrement than in liver samples but the opposite was noted for Cu, Hg, and Zn. Mercury concentrations in heron liver samples were biomagnified to a greater extent than Cd and Cr. Fledging success and eggshell thickness measurements were used as indicators of population health. These values were equivalent to or better than those noted for heron colonies elsewhere in the United States.« less