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Title: Smaller insulators handle higher voltage

Abstract

Researcher at Lawrence Livermore have designed the Ultra High Gradient Insulator, a device that can reliably withstand electrical voltages four times greater than before. The Ultra-HGI is designed with alternating layers which divide voltages so finely that the chances of failure are small, and when they do occur, they are confined to a very small portion of the insulator.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
560605
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Science and Technology Review; Other Information: PBD: Oct 1997
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
44 INSTRUMENTATION, INCLUDING NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE DETECTORS; LAYERS; PERFORMANCE; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; ELECTRICAL INSULATORS; THICKNESS; ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT

Citation Formats

Wilt, G. Smaller insulators handle higher voltage. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Wilt, G. Smaller insulators handle higher voltage. United States.
Wilt, G. 1997. "Smaller insulators handle higher voltage". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_560605,
title = {Smaller insulators handle higher voltage},
author = {Wilt, G.},
abstractNote = {Researcher at Lawrence Livermore have designed the Ultra High Gradient Insulator, a device that can reliably withstand electrical voltages four times greater than before. The Ultra-HGI is designed with alternating layers which divide voltages so finely that the chances of failure are small, and when they do occur, they are confined to a very small portion of the insulator.},
doi = {},
journal = {Science and Technology Review},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1997,
month =
}
  • Solitons have been investigated in a warm plasma through the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation, considering a smaller relativistic effect for {gamma}{approx_equal}O(v{sup 2}/c{sup 2}) and {gamma}{sub e}{approx_equal}O(u{sup 2}/c{sup 2}) and higher relativistic effects for {gamma}{approx_equal}O(v{sup 4}/c{sup 4}) and {gamma}{sub e}{approx_equal}O(u{sup 4/}c{sup 4}). Compressive fast ion-acoustic solitons are observed to exist in the entire range (u{sub 0}-v{sub 0}) subject to a suitable mathematical condition satisfied by the initial streaming velocities u{sub 0},v{sub 0} of the electrons and the ions, respectively, electron to ion mass ratio Q(=m{sub e}/m{sub i}) and ion to electron temperature ratio {sigma}(=T{sub i}/T{sub e}). Further, rarefactive solitons of prettymore » small amplitudes are observed in the small upper range of |u{sub 0}-v{sub 0}| for higher order relativistic effect which are found to change parabolically. It is essentially important to report in our model of plasma, that the higher order relativistic effect slows down the soliton speed to V{<=}0.10 for all temperature ratios {sigma} for small amplitude waves. On the other hand, the smaller order relativistic effect permits the soliton to exist even at a relatively much higher speed V<0.30. Solitons of high (negligible) amplitudes are found to generate at the smaller (greater) difference of initial streamings (u{sub 0}-v{sub 0}) corresponding to both the relativistic effects.« less
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