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Title: Wood fuel production from young Piedmont oak stands of sprout origin

Abstract

Total above ground tree weights were measured and fuel values calculated in 48 even-aged upland hardwood stands in the South Carolina Piedmont, aged 5 to 39 years since clearcutting, with oak site indices from 46 to 89. Due to well established root systems, growth of these sprout origin stands is rapid, even on poor sites, up to age 20 years. Mean annual increment of fuel value maximizes before 25 years on all sites, at 21.32 million Btu/acre/yr. on oak site 50, and at 33.62 million Btu/acre/yr. on site 90. Yields at age 30 years are about 650 million Btu/acre on typical poor sites. After age 30, the productivity of the poorer sites slows dramatically. With little potential of producing higher value products, a total wood fuel harvest between ages 20 and 30 years resulting in a vigorous regeneration of hardwood sprouts with good production rates over the next 20 to 30 years could be the most productive use of poorer sites. The vast acreages involved (over 1 million acres in the South Carolina Piedmont alone), coupled with the absence of costs and input energy in site preparation and maintenance, could prove utilization of this resource superior to cultivated energy plantations.more » 21 references.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Clemson Univ., SC
OSTI Identifier:
5585604
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5585604
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: For. Prod. J.; (United States); Journal Volume: 34:6
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; OAKS; CULTIVATION TECHNIQUES; PRODUCTIVITY; WOOD FUELS; PRODUCTION; AGE DEPENDENCE; BIOMASS PLANTATIONS; CALORIFIC VALUE; COPPICES; HARVESTING; OPERATING COST; SOUTH CAROLINA; COMBUSTION PROPERTIES; COST; ENERGY SOURCES; FEDERAL REGION IV; FORESTS; FUELS; NORTH AMERICA; PLANTS; TREES; USA 140504* -- Solar Energy Conversion-- Biomass Production & Conversion-- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Harris, R.A., and Zahner, R. Wood fuel production from young Piedmont oak stands of sprout origin. United States: N. p., 1984. Web.
Harris, R.A., & Zahner, R. Wood fuel production from young Piedmont oak stands of sprout origin. United States.
Harris, R.A., and Zahner, R. Fri . "Wood fuel production from young Piedmont oak stands of sprout origin". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5585604,
title = {Wood fuel production from young Piedmont oak stands of sprout origin},
author = {Harris, R.A. and Zahner, R.},
abstractNote = {Total above ground tree weights were measured and fuel values calculated in 48 even-aged upland hardwood stands in the South Carolina Piedmont, aged 5 to 39 years since clearcutting, with oak site indices from 46 to 89. Due to well established root systems, growth of these sprout origin stands is rapid, even on poor sites, up to age 20 years. Mean annual increment of fuel value maximizes before 25 years on all sites, at 21.32 million Btu/acre/yr. on oak site 50, and at 33.62 million Btu/acre/yr. on site 90. Yields at age 30 years are about 650 million Btu/acre on typical poor sites. After age 30, the productivity of the poorer sites slows dramatically. With little potential of producing higher value products, a total wood fuel harvest between ages 20 and 30 years resulting in a vigorous regeneration of hardwood sprouts with good production rates over the next 20 to 30 years could be the most productive use of poorer sites. The vast acreages involved (over 1 million acres in the South Carolina Piedmont alone), coupled with the absence of costs and input energy in site preparation and maintenance, could prove utilization of this resource superior to cultivated energy plantations. 21 references.},
doi = {},
journal = {For. Prod. J.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 34:6,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1984},
month = {Fri Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1984}
}
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