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Title: Enhanced phagocytosis of group A streptococci M type 6 by oleic acid

Abstract

M protein, located on the surface fimbriae of group A streptococci, is antiphagocytic by unknown means. It is known that oleic acid kills group A streptococci and distorts the fimbriae. The effect of oleic acid on phagocytosis of group A streptococci was examined. Phagocytosis of a strain possessing M protein (M+) and its M- variant was assessed by uptake of radiolabeled bacteria and by chemiluminescence. The M- but not the M+ streptococci were well phagocytized and induced chemiluminescence. Oleic acid-killed and heat-killed streptococci (both M+ and M-) were readily phagocytized and induced sustained chemiluminescence. M+ streptococci killed by ultraviolet irradiation were inefficiently phagocytized and did not induce chemiluminescence. Oleic acid-killed M+ streptococci absorbed type-specific antibody. An extract of M protein reduced the bactericidal capacity of oleic acid. It is proposed that oleic acid may bind to and alter the M protein of group A streptococci and thereby enhance phagocytosis.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5579087
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Infect. Dis.; (United States); Journal Volume: 143:4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; OLEIC ACID; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; STREPTOCOCCUS; PHAGOCYTOSIS; BACTERIA; CELL KILLING; LABELLED COMPOUNDS; PROTEINS; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; CARBOXYLIC ACIDS; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; MICROORGANISMS; MONOCARBOXYLIC ACIDS; ORGANIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; RADIATIONS; 550201* - Biochemistry- Tracer Techniques; 550701 - Microbiology- Tracer Techniques; 560302 - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Microorganisms- (-1987)

Citation Formats

Speert, D.P., Quie, P.G., and Wannamaker, L.W. Enhanced phagocytosis of group A streptococci M type 6 by oleic acid. United States: N. p., 1981. Web. doi:10.1093/infdis/143.4.570.
Speert, D.P., Quie, P.G., & Wannamaker, L.W. Enhanced phagocytosis of group A streptococci M type 6 by oleic acid. United States. doi:10.1093/infdis/143.4.570.
Speert, D.P., Quie, P.G., and Wannamaker, L.W. Wed . "Enhanced phagocytosis of group A streptococci M type 6 by oleic acid". United States. doi:10.1093/infdis/143.4.570.
@article{osti_5579087,
title = {Enhanced phagocytosis of group A streptococci M type 6 by oleic acid},
author = {Speert, D.P. and Quie, P.G. and Wannamaker, L.W.},
abstractNote = {M protein, located on the surface fimbriae of group A streptococci, is antiphagocytic by unknown means. It is known that oleic acid kills group A streptococci and distorts the fimbriae. The effect of oleic acid on phagocytosis of group A streptococci was examined. Phagocytosis of a strain possessing M protein (M+) and its M- variant was assessed by uptake of radiolabeled bacteria and by chemiluminescence. The M- but not the M+ streptococci were well phagocytized and induced chemiluminescence. Oleic acid-killed and heat-killed streptococci (both M+ and M-) were readily phagocytized and induced sustained chemiluminescence. M+ streptococci killed by ultraviolet irradiation were inefficiently phagocytized and did not induce chemiluminescence. Oleic acid-killed M+ streptococci absorbed type-specific antibody. An extract of M protein reduced the bactericidal capacity of oleic acid. It is proposed that oleic acid may bind to and alter the M protein of group A streptococci and thereby enhance phagocytosis.},
doi = {10.1093/infdis/143.4.570},
journal = {J. Infect. Dis.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 143:4,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 1981},
month = {Wed Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 1981}
}
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