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Title: Resurrection of neutrinos as dark matter

Abstract

It is shown that new observations of large scale structure in the universe (voids, foam, and large-scale velocity fields) are best understood if the dominant matter of the universe is in the form of massive (9eV less than or equal to m/sub nu/ less than or equal to 35 eV) neutrinos. Cold dark matter, even with biasing, seems unable to duplicate the combination of these observations (although a fine-tuned loophole with cold matter and percolated explosions may also marginally work.) The previous fatal problems of galaxy formation with neutrinos can be remedied by combining them with either cosmic strings or explosive galaxy formation. The former naturally gives the scale-free correlation function for galaxies, clusters, and superclusters, and gives large, but not necessarily spherical voids. The latter naturally gives spherical voids, but requires fine tuning and percolation to get the large scales and the scale-free correlation function. 39 refs.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5573235
Report Number(s):
FNAL/C-86/70-A
ON: DE86011025
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76CH03000; FG02-85ER40234
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Portions of this document are illegible in microfiche products
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; NEUTRINOS; MASS; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; COSMOLOGY; EXPLOSIONS; GALACTIC EVOLUTION; STRING MODELS; COMPOSITE MODELS; ELEMENTARY PARTICLES; EXTENDED PARTICLE MODEL; FERMIONS; LEPTONS; MASSLESS PARTICLES; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; PARTICLE MODELS; QUARK MODEL; 640106* - Astrophysics & Cosmology- Cosmology

Citation Formats

Schramm, D.N. Resurrection of neutrinos as dark matter. United States: N. p., 1986. Web. doi:10.2172/5573235.
Schramm, D.N. Resurrection of neutrinos as dark matter. United States. doi:10.2172/5573235.
Schramm, D.N. 1986. "Resurrection of neutrinos as dark matter". United States. doi:10.2172/5573235. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/5573235.
@article{osti_5573235,
title = {Resurrection of neutrinos as dark matter},
author = {Schramm, D.N.},
abstractNote = {It is shown that new observations of large scale structure in the universe (voids, foam, and large-scale velocity fields) are best understood if the dominant matter of the universe is in the form of massive (9eV less than or equal to m/sub nu/ less than or equal to 35 eV) neutrinos. Cold dark matter, even with biasing, seems unable to duplicate the combination of these observations (although a fine-tuned loophole with cold matter and percolated explosions may also marginally work.) The previous fatal problems of galaxy formation with neutrinos can be remedied by combining them with either cosmic strings or explosive galaxy formation. The former naturally gives the scale-free correlation function for galaxies, clusters, and superclusters, and gives large, but not necessarily spherical voids. The latter naturally gives spherical voids, but requires fine tuning and percolation to get the large scales and the scale-free correlation function. 39 refs.},
doi = {10.2172/5573235},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month = 5
}

Technical Report:

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  • Research in theoretical elementary particle physics was performed by the PI Yannick Meurice and co-PI Mary Hall Reno. New techniques designed for precision calculations of strong interaction physics were developed using the tensor renormalization group method. Large-scale Monte Carlo simulations with dynamical quarks were performed for candidate models for Higgs compositeness. Ab-initio lattice gauge theory calculations of semileptonic decays of B-mesons observed in collider experiments and relevant to test the validity of the standard model were performed with the Fermilab/MILC collaboration. The phenomenology of strong interaction physics was applied to new predictions for physics processes in accelerator physics experiments andmore » to cosmic ray production and interactions. A research focus has been on heavy quark production and their decays to neutrinos. The heavy quark contributions to atmospheric neutrino and muon fluxes have been evaluated, as have the neutrino fluxes from accelerator beams incident on heavy targets. Results are applicable to current and future particle physics experiments and to astrophysical neutrino detectors such as the IceCube Neutrino Observatory.« less
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  • The simplest model that can accommodate a viable nonbaryonic dark matter candidate is the standard electroweak theory with the addition of right-handed or sterile neutrinos. This model has been studied extensively in the context of the hot dark matter scenario. We reexamine this model and find that hot, warm, and cold dark matter are all possibilities. We focus on the case where sterile neutrinos are the dark matter. Since their only direct coupling is to left-handed or active neutrinos, the most efficient production mechanism is via neutrino oscillations. If the production rate is always less than the expansion rate, thenmore » these neutrinos will never be in thermal equilibrium. However, they may still play a significant role in the dynamics of the Universe and possibly provide the missing mass necessary for closure. We consider a single generation of neutrino fields ([nu][sub L], [nu][sub R]) with a Dirac mass, [mu], and a Majorana mass for the right-handed components only, M. For M [much gt] [mu] we show that the number density of sterile neutrinos is proportional to [mu][sup 2]/M so that the energy density today is independent of M. However M is crucial in determining the large scale structure of the Universe. In particular, M [approx equal] 0.1--1.0 key leads to warm dark matter and a structure formation scenario that may have some advantages over both the standard hot and cold dark matter scenarios.« less
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