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Title: Global methanol overcapacity will get worse

Abstract

The world methanol situation, characterized by an excess of 21% over demand in 1983, is expected to worsen by 1985 when a 29% excess is anticipated. Canada will suffer the most for its overly optimistic projections of methanol's use in fuel. The areas of greatest supply surplus, the US (at least until 1988), Canada, Mexico, Eastern Europe, and the Africa-Middle East region, are expected to compete fiercely for business in the biggest deficit areas of the Pacific Basin, Southeast Asia, and Western Europe. Several factors could turn the grim situation around: financial incentives for using methanol and sucess of the new method of converting methenol directly to gasoline. 3 figures.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5571310
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Chem. Eng. News; (United States); Journal Volume: 61:25
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
10 SYNTHETIC FUELS; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; METHANOL; FINANCIAL INCENTIVES; SUPPLY AND DEMAND; GLOBAL ASPECTS; TECHNOLOGY UTILIZATION; ALCOHOLS; HYDROXY COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; 090200* - Alcohol Fuels- (-1989); 295000 - Energy Planning & Policy- Hydrogen & Synthetic Fuels

Citation Formats

Anderson, E.V.. Global methanol overcapacity will get worse. United States: N. p., 1983. Web. doi:10.1021/cen-v061n033.p020.
Anderson, E.V.. Global methanol overcapacity will get worse. United States. doi:10.1021/cen-v061n033.p020.
Anderson, E.V.. 1983. "Global methanol overcapacity will get worse". United States. doi:10.1021/cen-v061n033.p020.
@article{osti_5571310,
title = {Global methanol overcapacity will get worse},
author = {Anderson, E.V.},
abstractNote = {The world methanol situation, characterized by an excess of 21% over demand in 1983, is expected to worsen by 1985 when a 29% excess is anticipated. Canada will suffer the most for its overly optimistic projections of methanol's use in fuel. The areas of greatest supply surplus, the US (at least until 1988), Canada, Mexico, Eastern Europe, and the Africa-Middle East region, are expected to compete fiercely for business in the biggest deficit areas of the Pacific Basin, Southeast Asia, and Western Europe. Several factors could turn the grim situation around: financial incentives for using methanol and sucess of the new method of converting methenol directly to gasoline. 3 figures.},
doi = {10.1021/cen-v061n033.p020},
journal = {Chem. Eng. News; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 61:25,
place = {United States},
year = 1983,
month = 6
}
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