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Title: Physical-chemical treatment of tar sand processing wastewater. Task No. 2. Sludge management studies. Final report

Abstract

Previously reported studies indicated the viability of ferric chloride coagulation as a major step in effective treatment of a steam flooding tar sand processing wastewater. The present task involved production of substantial quantities of sludge resulting from ferric chloride coagulation, characterization of the resulting sludge, and the assessment of selected chemical conditioning and dewatering techniques. Treatment was accomplished in 10 to 20 liter batches. The resulting composite sludge had a pH of 4.1 and a solids content of 1.43% (94.8% volatile). Specific resistance obtained from Buchner funnel tests of the composite sludge varied with the level of vacuum employed indicated a relatively compressible sludge. At a vacuum of 5.0 inches of mercury, a R value of 2.1 x 10/sup 10/ m/kg was observed. The compressibility was 0.95. The raw sludge had good filtration properties and dewatered in an acceptable manner. In order to ascertain potential improvement in dewatering rates, conditioning studies were conducted. A sample of sludge was frozen, then thawed to room temperature. The R value was reduced by a factor of thirty. An alternative process added small quantities of polymer. Seven polymers were tested (four cationic, two anionic and one non-ionic). For liquid polymers, the minimum R valuemore » was obtained for dosages of 40 to 80 ppM while for powders a dosage of 10 ppM was sufficient. Reductions of up to one order of magnitude were typical at optimum dosage. For small dosages (e.g. 5 ppM) reductions of 30 to 100% were common. Four sand bed filters were utilized to test gravity drainage and air drying characteristics of unconditioned sludge and sludges conditioned with 5 ppM of three selected polymers. Unconditioned sludge showed a tendency for early breakthrough of substantial solids. All of the polymers tested prevented this break-through.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Arizona Univ., Tucson (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics
OSTI Identifier:
5570579
Report Number(s):
DOE/LC/10678-2
ON: DE84003226
DOE Contract Number:  
AS20-81LC10678
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; SLUDGES; DRYING; WASTE PROCESSING; STEAM SOAK PROCESSES; COMPRESSIBILITY; FILTRATION; FLOCCULATION; FREEZING; IN-SITU PROCESSING; IRON CHLORIDES; OIL SANDS; ORGANIC POLYMERS; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTE WATER; BITUMINOUS MATERIALS; CARBONACEOUS MATERIALS; CHLORIDES; CHLORINE COMPOUNDS; ENERGY SOURCES; FLUID INJECTION PROCESSES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; HALIDES; HALOGEN COMPOUNDS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; IRON COMPOUNDS; LIQUID WASTES; MANAGEMENT; MATERIALS; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLYMERS; PRECIPITATION; PROCESSING; SEPARATION PROCESSES; TRANSITION ELEMENT COMPOUNDS; WASTES; WATER; 040900* - Oil Shales & Tar Sands- Waste management

Citation Formats

King, P H. Physical-chemical treatment of tar sand processing wastewater. Task No. 2. Sludge management studies. Final report. United States: N. p., 1983. Web.
King, P H. Physical-chemical treatment of tar sand processing wastewater. Task No. 2. Sludge management studies. Final report. United States.
King, P H. Fri . "Physical-chemical treatment of tar sand processing wastewater. Task No. 2. Sludge management studies. Final report". United States.
@article{osti_5570579,
title = {Physical-chemical treatment of tar sand processing wastewater. Task No. 2. Sludge management studies. Final report},
author = {King, P H},
abstractNote = {Previously reported studies indicated the viability of ferric chloride coagulation as a major step in effective treatment of a steam flooding tar sand processing wastewater. The present task involved production of substantial quantities of sludge resulting from ferric chloride coagulation, characterization of the resulting sludge, and the assessment of selected chemical conditioning and dewatering techniques. Treatment was accomplished in 10 to 20 liter batches. The resulting composite sludge had a pH of 4.1 and a solids content of 1.43% (94.8% volatile). Specific resistance obtained from Buchner funnel tests of the composite sludge varied with the level of vacuum employed indicated a relatively compressible sludge. At a vacuum of 5.0 inches of mercury, a R value of 2.1 x 10/sup 10/ m/kg was observed. The compressibility was 0.95. The raw sludge had good filtration properties and dewatered in an acceptable manner. In order to ascertain potential improvement in dewatering rates, conditioning studies were conducted. A sample of sludge was frozen, then thawed to room temperature. The R value was reduced by a factor of thirty. An alternative process added small quantities of polymer. Seven polymers were tested (four cationic, two anionic and one non-ionic). For liquid polymers, the minimum R value was obtained for dosages of 40 to 80 ppM while for powders a dosage of 10 ppM was sufficient. Reductions of up to one order of magnitude were typical at optimum dosage. For small dosages (e.g. 5 ppM) reductions of 30 to 100% were common. Four sand bed filters were utilized to test gravity drainage and air drying characteristics of unconditioned sludge and sludges conditioned with 5 ppM of three selected polymers. Unconditioned sludge showed a tendency for early breakthrough of substantial solids. All of the polymers tested prevented this break-through.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1983},
month = {4}
}

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