skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Influence of dietary vitamin E on the lungs of ozone-exposed rats

Abstract

The effect of dietary vitamin E on pulmonary susceptibility to near ambient levels of ozone was studied in rats. Exposure to 0.7 or 0.8 ppM ozone continuously for 7 days resulted in significant biochemical augmentations in the lungs of both vitamin E-deficient and -supplemented rats. The relative order of the change was glutathione (GSH) peroxidase > lactate dehydrogenase > glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P) dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase > reduced glutathione > malic enzyme > glutathione reductase > protein and malic dehydrogenase. Except for malic dehydrogenase, the degrees of biochemical changes were greater in the lungs of vitamin E-deficient rats than those of the supplemented group following ozone exposure, and the differences in the levels of GSH peroxidase, G-6-P dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase, and GSH were statisically significant. Histological examination of animal lungs revealed that all aminals exposed to 0.7 ppM ozone for 7 days had detectable lesions compared to none from the control groups. However, almost all the lungs categorized as having severe lesions by two investigators in a blind study were from rats fed the vitamin E-deficient diet, while nearly all the lungs from the supplemented group had mild lesions. The results suggest that dietary vitamin E alters cellular sensitivity of lungmore » tissue to ozone exposure, and that depletion of dietary vitamin E lowers the threshold concentration of ozone at which effects can be detected.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington
OSTI Identifier:
5566176
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Environ. Res.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 20:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; OZONE; TOXICITY; RATS; TOLERANCE; VITAMIN E; DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS; BIOCHEMICAL REACTION KINETICS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; ISOLATED VALUES; LUNGS; NUTRITIONAL DEFICIENCY; RESPONSE MODIFYING FACTORS; ANIMALS; BODY; DATA; DATA FORMS; INFORMATION; KINETICS; MAMMALS; NUMERICAL DATA; ORGANS; REACTION KINETICS; RESPIRATORY SYSTEM; RODENTS; VERTEBRATES; VITAMINS; 560305* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Vertebrates- (-1987); 550500 - Metabolism; 550200 - Biochemistry

Citation Formats

Chow, C K, Plopper, C G, and Dungworth, D L. Influence of dietary vitamin E on the lungs of ozone-exposed rats. United States: N. p., 1979. Web. doi:10.1016/0013-9351(79)90006-9.
Chow, C K, Plopper, C G, & Dungworth, D L. Influence of dietary vitamin E on the lungs of ozone-exposed rats. United States. https://doi.org/10.1016/0013-9351(79)90006-9
Chow, C K, Plopper, C G, and Dungworth, D L. Sat . "Influence of dietary vitamin E on the lungs of ozone-exposed rats". United States. https://doi.org/10.1016/0013-9351(79)90006-9.
@article{osti_5566176,
title = {Influence of dietary vitamin E on the lungs of ozone-exposed rats},
author = {Chow, C K and Plopper, C G and Dungworth, D L},
abstractNote = {The effect of dietary vitamin E on pulmonary susceptibility to near ambient levels of ozone was studied in rats. Exposure to 0.7 or 0.8 ppM ozone continuously for 7 days resulted in significant biochemical augmentations in the lungs of both vitamin E-deficient and -supplemented rats. The relative order of the change was glutathione (GSH) peroxidase > lactate dehydrogenase > glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P) dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase > reduced glutathione > malic enzyme > glutathione reductase > protein and malic dehydrogenase. Except for malic dehydrogenase, the degrees of biochemical changes were greater in the lungs of vitamin E-deficient rats than those of the supplemented group following ozone exposure, and the differences in the levels of GSH peroxidase, G-6-P dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase, and GSH were statisically significant. Histological examination of animal lungs revealed that all aminals exposed to 0.7 ppM ozone for 7 days had detectable lesions compared to none from the control groups. However, almost all the lungs categorized as having severe lesions by two investigators in a blind study were from rats fed the vitamin E-deficient diet, while nearly all the lungs from the supplemented group had mild lesions. The results suggest that dietary vitamin E alters cellular sensitivity of lung tissue to ozone exposure, and that depletion of dietary vitamin E lowers the threshold concentration of ozone at which effects can be detected.},
doi = {10.1016/0013-9351(79)90006-9},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/5566176}, journal = {Environ. Res.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 20:2,
place = {United States},
year = {1979},
month = {12}
}