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Title: Canine hematopoietic tumors: diagnosis, treatment and complications

Abstract

Canine hematopoietic tumors constitute a group of neoplasms that are frequently encountered in veterinary practice. Although common, they are also a diagnostically confusing group of tumors due to continued revision of their definition and classification. The confusion that arises from these changes presents the clinician with a perpetual challenge of diagnosis and therapy. Therapy of canine hematopoietic tumors has traditionally evolved from treatment of human patients with similar diseases, and in turn, these neoplasms have served as models for evaluating newer therapies for possible application in human patients. Methods of treatment have included chemotherapy, immunotherapy, radiation therapy, surgery, and hyperthermia. 9 tabs.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5559212
Report Number(s):
PNL-SA-13755; CONF-8603125-1
ON: DE86011111
DOE Contract Number:
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Veterinary spring symposium, Tuskegee, AL, USA, 23 Mar 1986
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; LEUKEMIA; CHEMOTHERAPY; LYMPHOMAS; DOGS; HEMATOPOIETIC SYSTEM; RADIOTHERAPY; VETERINARY MEDICINE; ANIMALS; BODY; DISEASES; HEMIC DISEASES; MAMMALS; MEDICINE; NEOPLASMS; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; RADIOLOGY; THERAPY; VERTEBRATES; 560152* - Radiation Effects on Animals- Animals

Citation Formats

Weller, R.E. Canine hematopoietic tumors: diagnosis, treatment and complications. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Weller, R.E. Canine hematopoietic tumors: diagnosis, treatment and complications. United States.
Weller, R.E. 1986. "Canine hematopoietic tumors: diagnosis, treatment and complications". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5559212,
title = {Canine hematopoietic tumors: diagnosis, treatment and complications},
author = {Weller, R.E.},
abstractNote = {Canine hematopoietic tumors constitute a group of neoplasms that are frequently encountered in veterinary practice. Although common, they are also a diagnostically confusing group of tumors due to continued revision of their definition and classification. The confusion that arises from these changes presents the clinician with a perpetual challenge of diagnosis and therapy. Therapy of canine hematopoietic tumors has traditionally evolved from treatment of human patients with similar diseases, and in turn, these neoplasms have served as models for evaluating newer therapies for possible application in human patients. Methods of treatment have included chemotherapy, immunotherapy, radiation therapy, surgery, and hyperthermia. 9 tabs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month = 2
}

Conference:
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