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Title: Refrigerator recycling and CFCs

Abstract

Utility-sponsored refrigerator and freezer pick-up programs have removed almost 900,000 inefficient appliances from the North American electric grid to date. While the CFC-12 refrigerant from the discarded appliances is typically removed and recycled, in all but a few programs the CFC-11 in the foam insulation is not. About a quarter-billion pounds of CFC-11 are banked in refrigerator foam in the United States. Release of this ``bank`` of CFC, combined with that from foam insulation used in buildings, will be the largest source of future emissions if preventive measures are not taken. Methods exist to recover the CFC for reuse or to destroy it by incineration. The task of recycling or destroying the CFCs and other materials from millions of refrigerators is a daunting challenge, but one in which utilities can play a leadership role. E Source believes that utilities can profitably serve as the catalyst for public-private partnerships that deliver comprehensive refrigerator recycling. Rather than treating such efforts solely as a DSM resource acquisition, utilities could position these programs as a multifaceted service delivery that offers convenient appliance removal for homeowners, a solid waste minimization service for landfills, a source of recycled materials for industry, and a CFC recovery and/ormore » disposal service in support of the HVAC industry and society`s atmospheric protection goals and laws. Financial mechanisms could be developed through these public-private enterprises to ensure that utilities are compensated for the extra cost of fully recycling refrigerators, including the foam CFC.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
55543
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Other Information: DN: Publication No. TM-94-2; PBD: 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; FREEZERS; RECYCLING; MATERIALS RECOVERY; REFRIGERATORS; CHLOROFLUOROCARBONS; COMBUSTION; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; ELECTRIC UTILITIES; PROGRAM MANAGEMENT; STEELS; POLLUTION REGULATIONS; INVENTORIES; COMPILED DATA; RECOMMENDATIONS; MUNICIPAL WASTES

Citation Formats

Shepard, M., Hawthorne, W., and Wilson, A. Refrigerator recycling and CFCs. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Shepard, M., Hawthorne, W., & Wilson, A. Refrigerator recycling and CFCs. United States.
Shepard, M., Hawthorne, W., and Wilson, A. Sat . "Refrigerator recycling and CFCs". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_55543,
title = {Refrigerator recycling and CFCs},
author = {Shepard, M. and Hawthorne, W. and Wilson, A.},
abstractNote = {Utility-sponsored refrigerator and freezer pick-up programs have removed almost 900,000 inefficient appliances from the North American electric grid to date. While the CFC-12 refrigerant from the discarded appliances is typically removed and recycled, in all but a few programs the CFC-11 in the foam insulation is not. About a quarter-billion pounds of CFC-11 are banked in refrigerator foam in the United States. Release of this ``bank`` of CFC, combined with that from foam insulation used in buildings, will be the largest source of future emissions if preventive measures are not taken. Methods exist to recover the CFC for reuse or to destroy it by incineration. The task of recycling or destroying the CFCs and other materials from millions of refrigerators is a daunting challenge, but one in which utilities can play a leadership role. E Source believes that utilities can profitably serve as the catalyst for public-private partnerships that deliver comprehensive refrigerator recycling. Rather than treating such efforts solely as a DSM resource acquisition, utilities could position these programs as a multifaceted service delivery that offers convenient appliance removal for homeowners, a solid waste minimization service for landfills, a source of recycled materials for industry, and a CFC recovery and/or disposal service in support of the HVAC industry and society`s atmospheric protection goals and laws. Financial mechanisms could be developed through these public-private enterprises to ensure that utilities are compensated for the extra cost of fully recycling refrigerators, including the foam CFC.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1994},
month = {Sat Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1994}
}

Book:
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