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Title: Advanced technology programs for small turboshaft engines; Past, present, future

Abstract

This paper addresses approximately 15 years of advanced technology programs sponsored by the United States Army Aviation Applied Technology Directorate and its predecessor organizations and conducted by GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE). Included in these programs is the accomplishment of (1) the 1500 shp demonstrator (GE12), which led to the 1700, and (2) the 5000 shp Modern Technology Demonstrator Engine (MTDE/GE27). Also included are several advanced technology component programs that have been completed or are ongoing through the early 1990s. The goals for the next generation of tri-service small advanced gas generator demonstration programs are shown. A prediction is thus made of the advancements required to fulfill the aircraft propulsion system established by the DoD/NASA Integrated High-Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) initiative through the year 2000.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. (AATD, Fort Eustis, VA (US))
  2. (GE Aircraft Engines, Lynn, MA (US))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5552443
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power; (United States); Journal Volume: 113:1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; TURBOJET ENGINES; DESIGN; AIRCRAFT; DEMONSTRATION PROGRAMS; GAS TURBINE ENGINES; PERFORMANCE; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; ENGINES; EQUIPMENT; HEAT ENGINES; INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES; MACHINERY; TURBOMACHINERY; 330103* - Internal Combustion Engines- Turbine

Citation Formats

Johnson, E.T., and Lindsay, H. Advanced technology programs for small turboshaft engines; Past, present, future. United States: N. p., 1991. Web. doi:10.1115/1.2906528.
Johnson, E.T., & Lindsay, H. Advanced technology programs for small turboshaft engines; Past, present, future. United States. doi:10.1115/1.2906528.
Johnson, E.T., and Lindsay, H. 1991. "Advanced technology programs for small turboshaft engines; Past, present, future". United States. doi:10.1115/1.2906528.
@article{osti_5552443,
title = {Advanced technology programs for small turboshaft engines; Past, present, future},
author = {Johnson, E.T. and Lindsay, H.},
abstractNote = {This paper addresses approximately 15 years of advanced technology programs sponsored by the United States Army Aviation Applied Technology Directorate and its predecessor organizations and conducted by GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE). Included in these programs is the accomplishment of (1) the 1500 shp demonstrator (GE12), which led to the 1700, and (2) the 5000 shp Modern Technology Demonstrator Engine (MTDE/GE27). Also included are several advanced technology component programs that have been completed or are ongoing through the early 1990s. The goals for the next generation of tri-service small advanced gas generator demonstration programs are shown. A prediction is thus made of the advancements required to fulfill the aircraft propulsion system established by the DoD/NASA Integrated High-Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) initiative through the year 2000.},
doi = {10.1115/1.2906528},
journal = {Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 113:1,
place = {United States},
year = 1991,
month = 1
}
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