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Title: Three-dimensional SAR imaging using cross-track coherent stereo collections

Abstract

In this paper we describe a new method for creating three-dimensional images using pairs of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images obtained from a unique collection geometry. This collection mode involves synthetic apertures that have a common center. In this sense the illumination directions for the two SAR images are the same, while the slant planes are at different spatial orientations. The slant plane orientations give rise to cross-range layover (fore-shortening) components in the two images that are of equal magnitude but opposite directions. This differential cross-range layover is therefore proportional to the elevation of a given target, which is completely analogous to the situation in stereo optical imaging, wherein two film planes (corresponding to the two slant planes) result in elevation-dependent parallax. Because the two SAR collections are coherent in this particular collection mode, the images have the same speckle patterns throughout. As a result, the images may be placed into stereo correspondence via calculation of correlations between micro-patches of the complex image data. The resulting computed digital stereo elevation map can be quite accurate. Alternatively, an analog anaglyph can be displayed for 3-D viewing, avoiding the necessity of the stereo correspondence calculation.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
555236
Report Number(s):
SAND-97-2715C; CONF-971154-
ON: DE98000852; TRN: 98:000109
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Asilomar conference, Monterey, CA (United States), 2-5 Nov 1997; Other Information: PBD: 1997
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING NOT INCLUDED IN OTHER CATEGORIES; 99 MATHEMATICS, COMPUTERS, INFORMATION SCIENCE, MANAGEMENT, LAW, MISCELLANEOUS; THREE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; IMAGE PROCESSING; RADAR; AIRCRAFT; COMPLEX TERRAIN

Citation Formats

Jakowatz, C.V. Jr., Wahl, D.E., and Thompson, P.A. Three-dimensional SAR imaging using cross-track coherent stereo collections. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Jakowatz, C.V. Jr., Wahl, D.E., & Thompson, P.A. Three-dimensional SAR imaging using cross-track coherent stereo collections. United States.
Jakowatz, C.V. Jr., Wahl, D.E., and Thompson, P.A. Sat . "Three-dimensional SAR imaging using cross-track coherent stereo collections". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/555236.
@article{osti_555236,
title = {Three-dimensional SAR imaging using cross-track coherent stereo collections},
author = {Jakowatz, C.V. Jr. and Wahl, D.E. and Thompson, P.A.},
abstractNote = {In this paper we describe a new method for creating three-dimensional images using pairs of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images obtained from a unique collection geometry. This collection mode involves synthetic apertures that have a common center. In this sense the illumination directions for the two SAR images are the same, while the slant planes are at different spatial orientations. The slant plane orientations give rise to cross-range layover (fore-shortening) components in the two images that are of equal magnitude but opposite directions. This differential cross-range layover is therefore proportional to the elevation of a given target, which is completely analogous to the situation in stereo optical imaging, wherein two film planes (corresponding to the two slant planes) result in elevation-dependent parallax. Because the two SAR collections are coherent in this particular collection mode, the images have the same speckle patterns throughout. As a result, the images may be placed into stereo correspondence via calculation of correlations between micro-patches of the complex image data. The resulting computed digital stereo elevation map can be quite accurate. Alternatively, an analog anaglyph can be displayed for 3-D viewing, avoiding the necessity of the stereo correspondence calculation.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 1997},
month = {Sat Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 1997}
}

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