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Title: Providers target industrial areas

Abstract

Energy customers in California are negotiating new deals now that the California Public Utilities Commission has dropped its plan to gradually phase in energy deregulation. The commission has set January 1, 1998 as the date when most energy consumers in the state will be free to choose their providers. Deals currently under negotiation are mostly long-term electrical supply contracts with entire cities. Initially, the cities most likely to enter such contracts are those that wish to use the prospect of cheap energy to keep existing industry and lure new industry. One such deal has been set in South San Francisco, and industrial suburb of San Francisco with several fine chemicals and biotechnology firms. The city has signed a five-year contract with FirstPoint (Portland, OR) to provide energy and related services for residents, businesses, and industry. But while residential and small business customers expect to see only a 10% drop in their overall bills, industrial customers foresee larger savings because of discounts to large energy users offered by FirstPoint and the city.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
554933
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Chemical Week; Journal Volume: 159; Journal Issue: 23; Other Information: PBD: 11 Jun 1997
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; BIOTECHNOLOGY; FINANCIAL INCENTIVES; PUBLIC UTILITIES; COST; ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY; CONTRACTS; DEREGULATION; CHEMICAL INDUSTRY; CALIFORNIA

Citation Formats

Vames, S. Providers target industrial areas. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Vames, S. Providers target industrial areas. United States.
Vames, S. 1997. "Providers target industrial areas". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_554933,
title = {Providers target industrial areas},
author = {Vames, S.},
abstractNote = {Energy customers in California are negotiating new deals now that the California Public Utilities Commission has dropped its plan to gradually phase in energy deregulation. The commission has set January 1, 1998 as the date when most energy consumers in the state will be free to choose their providers. Deals currently under negotiation are mostly long-term electrical supply contracts with entire cities. Initially, the cities most likely to enter such contracts are those that wish to use the prospect of cheap energy to keep existing industry and lure new industry. One such deal has been set in South San Francisco, and industrial suburb of San Francisco with several fine chemicals and biotechnology firms. The city has signed a five-year contract with FirstPoint (Portland, OR) to provide energy and related services for residents, businesses, and industry. But while residential and small business customers expect to see only a 10% drop in their overall bills, industrial customers foresee larger savings because of discounts to large energy users offered by FirstPoint and the city.},
doi = {},
journal = {Chemical Week},
number = 23,
volume = 159,
place = {United States},
year = 1997,
month = 6
}
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