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Title: Solar energy systems cost

Abstract

Five major areas of work currently being pursued in the United States in solar energy which will have a significant impact on the world's energy situation in the future are addressed. The five significant areas discussed include a technical description of several solar technologies, current and projected cost of the selected solar systems, and cost methodologies which are under development. In addition, sensitivity considerations which are unique to solar energy systems and end user applications are included. A total of six solar technologies - biomass, photovoltaics, wind, ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), solar thermal, and industrial process heat (IPH) have been included in a brief technical description to present the variety of systems and their techncial status. System schematics have been included of systems which have been constructed, are currently in the detail design and test stage of development, or are of a conceptual nature.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO
OSTI Identifier:
5538166
Report Number(s):
CONF-8007136-
Journal ID: CODEN: AACTA
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Trans. Am. Assoc. Cost Eng.; (United States); Conference: 24. annual meeting of the American Association of Cost Engineers, Washington, DC, USA, 6 Jul 1980
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 17 WIND ENERGY; BIOMASS; ECONOMICS; OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION; SOLAR CELLS; SOLAR PROCESS HEAT; SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS; WIND POWER; CAPITALIZED COST; COST; REGRESSION ANALYSIS; REVIEWS; SOLAR ENERGY; CONVERSION; DIRECT ENERGY CONVERTERS; DOCUMENT TYPES; ENERGY; ENERGY CONVERSION; ENERGY SOURCES; EQUIPMENT; HEAT; MATHEMATICS; PHOTOELECTRIC CELLS; PHOTOVOLTAIC CELLS; POWER; POWER PLANTS; PROCESS HEAT; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; SOLAR ENERGY CONVERSION; SOLAR EQUIPMENT; SOLAR POWER PLANTS; STATISTICS; THERMAL POWER PLANTS 140000* -- Solar Energy; 170000 -- Wind Energy

Citation Formats

Lavender, J.A. Solar energy systems cost. United States: N. p., 1980. Web.
Lavender, J.A. Solar energy systems cost. United States.
Lavender, J.A. 1980. "Solar energy systems cost". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5538166,
title = {Solar energy systems cost},
author = {Lavender, J.A.},
abstractNote = {Five major areas of work currently being pursued in the United States in solar energy which will have a significant impact on the world's energy situation in the future are addressed. The five significant areas discussed include a technical description of several solar technologies, current and projected cost of the selected solar systems, and cost methodologies which are under development. In addition, sensitivity considerations which are unique to solar energy systems and end user applications are included. A total of six solar technologies - biomass, photovoltaics, wind, ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), solar thermal, and industrial process heat (IPH) have been included in a brief technical description to present the variety of systems and their techncial status. System schematics have been included of systems which have been constructed, are currently in the detail design and test stage of development, or are of a conceptual nature.},
doi = {},
journal = {Trans. Am. Assoc. Cost Eng.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1980,
month = 1
}

Conference:
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