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Title: Rural energy and development

Abstract

The author discusses the worldwide problem and need for rural electrification to support development. He points out that rural areas will pay high rates to receive such services, but cannot afford the capital cost for conventional services. The author looks at this problem from the point of energy choices, subsides, initial costs, financing, investors, local involvement, and governmental actions. In particular he is concerned with ways to make better use of biofuels, to promote sustainable harvesting, and to encourage development of more modern fuels.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
551977
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-440-23409; CONF-9704141-
ON: DE97008397; TRN: 97:005443-0002
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Village power `97, Arlington, VA (United States), 14-15 Apr 1997; Other Information: PBD: 1997; Related Information: Is Part Of Village Power `97. Proceedings; Cardinal, J.; Flowers, L.; Taylor, R.; Weingart, J. [eds.]; PB: 521 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; RURAL AREAS; ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT; ENERGY SOURCE DEVELOPMENT; BIOMASS; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; ELECTRIC POWER; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; USES

Citation Formats

Stern, R. Rural energy and development. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Stern, R. Rural energy and development. United States.
Stern, R. Mon . "Rural energy and development". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/551977.
@article{osti_551977,
title = {Rural energy and development},
author = {Stern, R.},
abstractNote = {The author discusses the worldwide problem and need for rural electrification to support development. He points out that rural areas will pay high rates to receive such services, but cannot afford the capital cost for conventional services. The author looks at this problem from the point of energy choices, subsides, initial costs, financing, investors, local involvement, and governmental actions. In particular he is concerned with ways to make better use of biofuels, to promote sustainable harvesting, and to encourage development of more modern fuels.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 1997},
month = {Mon Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 1997}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

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