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Title: (Biogeochemical pathways at artificial radionuclides)

Abstract

Many of the present computer codes used to assist management decisions on hazardous waste management issues have not been verified or tested and, in many instances, are operated by individuals lacking specific expertise about the overall behavior of radionuclides in the environment. BIOMOVS is an international effort to test such codes. SCOPE-RADPATH has been organized to address the data needs for reliable environmental assessment of radionuclides and the data required for code testing. Concern was expressed at both meetings that computer codes are being inadvertently used as a substitute for scientific expertise and are obscuring rather than identifying needs for further research. Efforts to alleviate this situation are apparent among the scientific community funded by the Commission of the European Communities and the Nordic Liason Committee for Atomic Energy. Attempts are also being made to transfer information about the environmental behavior of radionuclides to other types of trace contaminants in the biosphere, using radionuclides as quantitative tracers of major biospheric transport processes. Of particular importance is the assessment of the transfer of radioactive contaminants from watersheds into surface waters and subsequent bioaccumulation into aquatic food chains as well as the long-term remobilization of contaminants initially immobilized in sediment.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE/ER
OSTI Identifier:
5517700
Report Number(s):
ORNL/FTR-3269
ON: DE89017471
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-84OR21400
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; BIOLOGICAL ACCUMULATION; WATERSHEDS; CONTAMINATION; B CODES; BIOSPHERE; COMPUTER CODES; DECISION MAKING; MASS TRANSFER; MEETINGS; RADIOISOTOPES; SPAIN; TRAVEL; UNITED KINGDOM; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; ENVIRONMENT; EUROPE; ISOTOPES; MATERIALS; 510300* - Environment, Terrestrial- Radioactive Materials Monitoring & Transport- (-1989); 520300 - Environment, Aquatic- Radioactive Materials Monitoring & Transport- (1989)

Citation Formats

Hoffman, F.O. (Biogeochemical pathways at artificial radionuclides). United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Hoffman, F.O. (Biogeochemical pathways at artificial radionuclides). United States.
Hoffman, F.O. 1989. "(Biogeochemical pathways at artificial radionuclides)". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5517700,
title = {(Biogeochemical pathways at artificial radionuclides)},
author = {Hoffman, F.O.},
abstractNote = {Many of the present computer codes used to assist management decisions on hazardous waste management issues have not been verified or tested and, in many instances, are operated by individuals lacking specific expertise about the overall behavior of radionuclides in the environment. BIOMOVS is an international effort to test such codes. SCOPE-RADPATH has been organized to address the data needs for reliable environmental assessment of radionuclides and the data required for code testing. Concern was expressed at both meetings that computer codes are being inadvertently used as a substitute for scientific expertise and are obscuring rather than identifying needs for further research. Efforts to alleviate this situation are apparent among the scientific community funded by the Commission of the European Communities and the Nordic Liason Committee for Atomic Energy. Attempts are also being made to transfer information about the environmental behavior of radionuclides to other types of trace contaminants in the biosphere, using radionuclides as quantitative tracers of major biospheric transport processes. Of particular importance is the assessment of the transfer of radioactive contaminants from watersheds into surface waters and subsequent bioaccumulation into aquatic food chains as well as the long-term remobilization of contaminants initially immobilized in sediment.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1989,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:
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