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Title: Utilization of solar radiation by polar animals: an optical model for pelts

Abstract

A summary of existing passive solar-heat conversion panels provides the basis for a definition of an ideal passive solar-heat converter. Evidence for the existence of a biological greenhouse effect in certain homopolar homeothermic species is reviewed. The thermal and optical properties of homeothermic pelts, in particular those of the polar bear, are described, and a qualitative optical model of the polar bear pelt is proposed. The effectiveness of polar bear and seal pelts as solar-heat converters is discussed, and comparison is made with the ideal converter.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Northeastern University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Boston, Massachusetts 02115
OSTI Identifier:
5516657
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Appl. Opt.; (United States); Journal Volume: 19:3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; MAMMALS; SOLAR ENERGY CONVERSION; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; OPTICAL MODELS; POLAR REGIONS; ANIMALS; CONVERSION; ENERGY CONVERSION; VERTEBRATES; 140500* - Solar Energy Conversion

Citation Formats

Grojean, R.E., Sousa, J.A., and Henry, M.C.. Utilization of solar radiation by polar animals: an optical model for pelts. United States: N. p., 1980. Web. doi:10.1364/AO.19.000339.
Grojean, R.E., Sousa, J.A., & Henry, M.C.. Utilization of solar radiation by polar animals: an optical model for pelts. United States. doi:10.1364/AO.19.000339.
Grojean, R.E., Sousa, J.A., and Henry, M.C.. 1980. "Utilization of solar radiation by polar animals: an optical model for pelts". United States. doi:10.1364/AO.19.000339.
@article{osti_5516657,
title = {Utilization of solar radiation by polar animals: an optical model for pelts},
author = {Grojean, R.E. and Sousa, J.A. and Henry, M.C.},
abstractNote = {A summary of existing passive solar-heat conversion panels provides the basis for a definition of an ideal passive solar-heat converter. Evidence for the existence of a biological greenhouse effect in certain homopolar homeothermic species is reviewed. The thermal and optical properties of homeothermic pelts, in particular those of the polar bear, are described, and a qualitative optical model of the polar bear pelt is proposed. The effectiveness of polar bear and seal pelts as solar-heat converters is discussed, and comparison is made with the ideal converter.},
doi = {10.1364/AO.19.000339},
journal = {Appl. Opt.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 19:3,
place = {United States},
year = 1980,
month = 2
}
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