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Title: Effect of age on pulmonary structure and function of immature and adult animals and man

Abstract

Literature on the comparative effects of aging on lungs of immature and adult animals and man was reviewed and additional data for dogs were presented. The dog is the only animal for which comprehensive data have been reported. Human lungs grow primarily by addition of alveoli to 8 y, then by increasing the size of respiratory airspaces. Alveolar sizes of most mammals are similar at birth but vary in proportion to body size in adults. Lung volumes of dogs and man increase in proportion to body growth until young adult-hood, and then total lung volume remains constant. Maximal functonal efficiencies are reached at approximately 20 y in man and 1 y in dogs. Lungs of dogs and man also undergo similar progressive age-related changes during adulthood. Alveoli enlarge and coalesce, resulting in losses of elasticity and surface area and an increase in the fixed lung volume at the expense of mobile volume. Gas mixing and alveolar-capillary gas exchange become less efficient. Static pressure-volume relationships of all adult mammals are shifted toward reduced elastic recoil with age. In contrast to findings in man and dogs, both excised and intact lung volumes of rodents continue to increase after young adulthood. The gasmore » exchange capacity of rats increases in parallel to the volume increase. These species differences demonstrate the need for careful selection of animal models for the study of aging of the human lung.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM
OSTI Identifier:
5504292
DOE Contract Number:  
EY-76-C-04-1013
Resource Type:
Conference
Journal Name:
Fed. Proc.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 38:2; Conference: 62. annual meeting of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, Atlantic City, NJ, 13 Apr 1978
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; DOGS; ANIMAL GROWTH; LUNGS; LIFE CYCLE; MAN; PATHOLOGICAL CHANGES; AGE DEPENDENCE; RODENTS; AGE GROUPS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; DYNAMIC FUNCTION STUDIES; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; ISOLATED VALUES; LUNG CLEARANCE; ANIMALS; BODY; CLEARANCE; DATA; DATA FORMS; DISEASES; EXCRETION; GROWTH; INFORMATION; MAMMALS; NUMERICAL DATA; ORGANS; PRIMATES; RESPIRATORY SYSTEM; VERTEBRATES; 550800* - Morphology; 551000 - Physiological Systems

Citation Formats

Mauderly, J.L. Effect of age on pulmonary structure and function of immature and adult animals and man. United States: N. p., 1979. Web.
Mauderly, J.L. Effect of age on pulmonary structure and function of immature and adult animals and man. United States.
Mauderly, J.L. Thu . "Effect of age on pulmonary structure and function of immature and adult animals and man". United States.
@article{osti_5504292,
title = {Effect of age on pulmonary structure and function of immature and adult animals and man},
author = {Mauderly, J.L.},
abstractNote = {Literature on the comparative effects of aging on lungs of immature and adult animals and man was reviewed and additional data for dogs were presented. The dog is the only animal for which comprehensive data have been reported. Human lungs grow primarily by addition of alveoli to 8 y, then by increasing the size of respiratory airspaces. Alveolar sizes of most mammals are similar at birth but vary in proportion to body size in adults. Lung volumes of dogs and man increase in proportion to body growth until young adult-hood, and then total lung volume remains constant. Maximal functonal efficiencies are reached at approximately 20 y in man and 1 y in dogs. Lungs of dogs and man also undergo similar progressive age-related changes during adulthood. Alveoli enlarge and coalesce, resulting in losses of elasticity and surface area and an increase in the fixed lung volume at the expense of mobile volume. Gas mixing and alveolar-capillary gas exchange become less efficient. Static pressure-volume relationships of all adult mammals are shifted toward reduced elastic recoil with age. In contrast to findings in man and dogs, both excised and intact lung volumes of rodents continue to increase after young adulthood. The gas exchange capacity of rats increases in parallel to the volume increase. These species differences demonstrate the need for careful selection of animal models for the study of aging of the human lung.},
doi = {},
journal = {Fed. Proc.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 38:2,
place = {United States},
year = {1979},
month = {2}
}

Conference:
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