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Title: Epoxy coatings over latex block fillers

Abstract

Failures of polymerized epoxy coatings applied over latex/acrylic block fillers continue to plague owners of commercial buildings, particularly those with high architectural content such as condominiums, high rise offices, etc. Water treatment facilities in paper mills are especially prone to this problem. The types of failures include delamination of the topcoats, blisters in both the block fillers and the topcoats and disintegration of the block filler itself. While the problem is well known, the approach to a solution is not. A study of several coatings manufacturer`s Product Data Sheets shows a wide variance in the recommendations for what are purportedly generically equivalent block fillers. While one manufacturer might take an essentially architectural approach, another will take a heavy-duty industrial approach. To the specifying architect or engineer who has little training in the complexities of protective coating systems, this presents a dilemma. Who does he believe? What does he specify? To whom can he turn for independent advice?

Authors:
 [1]
  1. S. G. Pinney and Associates, Inc., Port St. Lucie, FL (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
549865
Report Number(s):
CONF-970332-
TRN: IM9752%%88
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Corrosion 97. 52. annual corrosion conference of the National Association of Corrosion Engineers: economics and performance - bridging the gap and NACExpo, New Orleans, LA (United States), 9-14 Mar 1997; Other Information: PBD: 1997; Related Information: Is Part Of Corrosion/97 conference papers; PB: [4584] p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; EPOXIDES; PROTECTIVE COATINGS; WATER TREATMENT PLANTS; COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS; BUILDING MATERIALS; LATEX; DEFORMATION; FAILURES; CONCRETES; STRESSES; MOISTURE; RECOMMENDATIONS; INSTALLATION

Citation Formats

Vincent, L.D. Epoxy coatings over latex block fillers. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Vincent, L.D. Epoxy coatings over latex block fillers. United States.
Vincent, L.D. 1997. "Epoxy coatings over latex block fillers". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_549865,
title = {Epoxy coatings over latex block fillers},
author = {Vincent, L.D.},
abstractNote = {Failures of polymerized epoxy coatings applied over latex/acrylic block fillers continue to plague owners of commercial buildings, particularly those with high architectural content such as condominiums, high rise offices, etc. Water treatment facilities in paper mills are especially prone to this problem. The types of failures include delamination of the topcoats, blisters in both the block fillers and the topcoats and disintegration of the block filler itself. While the problem is well known, the approach to a solution is not. A study of several coatings manufacturer`s Product Data Sheets shows a wide variance in the recommendations for what are purportedly generically equivalent block fillers. While one manufacturer might take an essentially architectural approach, another will take a heavy-duty industrial approach. To the specifying architect or engineer who has little training in the complexities of protective coating systems, this presents a dilemma. Who does he believe? What does he specify? To whom can he turn for independent advice?},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1997,
month =
}

Conference:
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