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Title: Microwaves modify thermoregulatory behavior in squirrel monkey

Abstract

Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) trained to regulate environmental temperature (Ta) behaviorally were exposed in the far field of a horn antenna to ten-minute periods of 2,450 MHz CW microwaves. Incident power density ranged from 1 to 22 mW/cm2. The corresponding specific absorption rate (SAR), derived from temperature increments in saline-filled styrofoam models, ranged from 0.15 to 3.25 W/kg. Controls included exposure to infrared radiation equivalent incident energy and no radiation exposure. Normal thermo-regulatory behavior produces tight control over environmental and body temperatures; most monkeys select a Ta of 34-36 degrees C. Ten-minute exposures to 2,450 MHz CW microwaves at an incident power density of 6-8 mW/cm2 stimulated all animals to select a lower Ta. This threshold energy represents a whole-body SAR of 1.1 W/kg, about 20% of the resting metabolic rate of the monkey. Thermoregulatory behavior was highly efficient, and skin and rectal temperatures remained stable, even at 22 mW/cm2 where the preferred Ta was lowered by as much as 4 degrees C. No comparable reduction in selected Ta below control levels occurred during exposure to infrared radiation of equal incident power density.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5498461
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Bioelectromagnetics (N.Y.); (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 1:1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; MICROWAVE RADIATION; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; THERMOREGULATION; SENSITIVITY; BEHAVIOR; BODY TEMPERATURE; MONKEYS; PHYSIOLOGY; POWER DENSITY; ANIMALS; CONTROL; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; MAMMALS; PRIMATES; RADIATIONS; TEMPERATURE CONTROL; VERTEBRATES; 560400* - Other Environmental Pollutant Effects; 551000 - Physiological Systems; 550100 - Behavioral Biology

Citation Formats

Adair, E R, and Adams, B W. Microwaves modify thermoregulatory behavior in squirrel monkey. United States: N. p., 1980. Web. doi:10.1002/bem.2250010102.
Adair, E R, & Adams, B W. Microwaves modify thermoregulatory behavior in squirrel monkey. United States. doi:10.1002/bem.2250010102.
Adair, E R, and Adams, B W. Tue . "Microwaves modify thermoregulatory behavior in squirrel monkey". United States. doi:10.1002/bem.2250010102.
@article{osti_5498461,
title = {Microwaves modify thermoregulatory behavior in squirrel monkey},
author = {Adair, E R and Adams, B W},
abstractNote = {Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) trained to regulate environmental temperature (Ta) behaviorally were exposed in the far field of a horn antenna to ten-minute periods of 2,450 MHz CW microwaves. Incident power density ranged from 1 to 22 mW/cm2. The corresponding specific absorption rate (SAR), derived from temperature increments in saline-filled styrofoam models, ranged from 0.15 to 3.25 W/kg. Controls included exposure to infrared radiation equivalent incident energy and no radiation exposure. Normal thermo-regulatory behavior produces tight control over environmental and body temperatures; most monkeys select a Ta of 34-36 degrees C. Ten-minute exposures to 2,450 MHz CW microwaves at an incident power density of 6-8 mW/cm2 stimulated all animals to select a lower Ta. This threshold energy represents a whole-body SAR of 1.1 W/kg, about 20% of the resting metabolic rate of the monkey. Thermoregulatory behavior was highly efficient, and skin and rectal temperatures remained stable, even at 22 mW/cm2 where the preferred Ta was lowered by as much as 4 degrees C. No comparable reduction in selected Ta below control levels occurred during exposure to infrared radiation of equal incident power density.},
doi = {10.1002/bem.2250010102},
journal = {Bioelectromagnetics (N.Y.); (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 1:1,
place = {United States},
year = {1980},
month = {1}
}