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Title: Beam stability in a 6 GeV synchrotron light source

Abstract

Future synchrotron radiation sources designed to produce low emittance electron beams for wigglers and undulators will present beam position control problems essentially similar to those encountered by users of existing accelerators, however tolerances will be tighter due to: (1) the small emittance (7 x 10/sup -9/ mrad) proposed for the electron beam and the correspondingly small emittances (sizes) of secondary photon beams, (2) the sensitivity of the electron beam closed orbit to quadrupole motion and dipole roll, (3) the high power levels associated with undulator and wiggler beams which will permit (and probably require) high precision and stability of the photon beam position measurements, in addition, (4) the large number of users on the roughly sixty beam lines will demand beams capable of producing the best experimental results. For the present paper, we assume the accelerator control function, which would initially involve making and coordinating all changes, would eventually evolve to setting and verifying the limits of user control: within these limits the beam position would be controlled by users. This paper describes the effects of motion of beam components (quads, rf cavities and dipoles) on the beam and considers the properties of a compensation system from the perspective ofmore » users. The system departs from standard practice in considering active perturbation of the electron beam to verify beam corrections. The effects of local closed orbit perturbations to direct undulator beams at different experimental setups are also considered. 8 refs., 3 figs.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5488110
Report Number(s):
CONF-850504-175
ON: DE85013850
DOE Contract Number:
W-31-109-ENG-38
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Particle accelerator conference, Vancouver, Canada, 13 May 1985
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; 07 ISOTOPES AND RADIATION SOURCES; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCES; STABILITY; BEAM EMITTANCE; BEAM MONITORING; BEAM OPTICS; CONTROL SYSTEMS; GEV RANGE 01-10; MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS; PHOTON BEAMS; BEAMS; ENERGY RANGE; GEV RANGE; MONITORING; RADIATION SOURCES; 430200* - Particle Accelerators- Beam Dynamics, Field Calculations, & Ion Optics; 070200 - Radiation Sources

Citation Formats

Norem, J., Knott, M., and Rauchas, A. Beam stability in a 6 GeV synchrotron light source. United States: N. p., 1985. Web.
Norem, J., Knott, M., & Rauchas, A. Beam stability in a 6 GeV synchrotron light source. United States.
Norem, J., Knott, M., and Rauchas, A. Tue . "Beam stability in a 6 GeV synchrotron light source". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/5488110.
@article{osti_5488110,
title = {Beam stability in a 6 GeV synchrotron light source},
author = {Norem, J. and Knott, M. and Rauchas, A.},
abstractNote = {Future synchrotron radiation sources designed to produce low emittance electron beams for wigglers and undulators will present beam position control problems essentially similar to those encountered by users of existing accelerators, however tolerances will be tighter due to: (1) the small emittance (7 x 10/sup -9/ mrad) proposed for the electron beam and the correspondingly small emittances (sizes) of secondary photon beams, (2) the sensitivity of the electron beam closed orbit to quadrupole motion and dipole roll, (3) the high power levels associated with undulator and wiggler beams which will permit (and probably require) high precision and stability of the photon beam position measurements, in addition, (4) the large number of users on the roughly sixty beam lines will demand beams capable of producing the best experimental results. For the present paper, we assume the accelerator control function, which would initially involve making and coordinating all changes, would eventually evolve to setting and verifying the limits of user control: within these limits the beam position would be controlled by users. This paper describes the effects of motion of beam components (quads, rf cavities and dipoles) on the beam and considers the properties of a compensation system from the perspective of users. The system departs from standard practice in considering active perturbation of the electron beam to verify beam corrections. The effects of local closed orbit perturbations to direct undulator beams at different experimental setups are also considered. 8 refs., 3 figs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1985},
month = {Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1985}
}

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  • This paper describes the effects of motion of beam components (quads, rf cavities and dipoles) on the beam and considers the properties of a compensation system from the perspective of users. The system departs from standard practice in considering active perturbation of the electron beam to verify beam corrections. The effects of local closed orbit perturbations to direct undulator beams at different experimental setups are also considered.
  • In this document, preliminary conceptual designs are presented for ten sample beamlines for the 6 GeV Light Source. These beamlines will accommodate investigations in solid-state physics, materials science, materials technology, chemical technology, and biological and medical sciences. In future, the designs will be altered to include new developments in x-ray optics and hardware technologies. The research areas addressed by the samples beamlines are as follows: Topography and Radiography/Tomography (section 2); Inelastic Scattering with Ultrahigh Energy Resolution (Section 3); Surface and Bulk Studies Using High Momentum Resolution (Section 4); Inelastic Scattering from Charge and Spin (Section 5); Advanced X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopymore » Studies (Section 6); Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Studies (Section 7); General Purpose Scattering for Materials Studies (Section 8); Multiple-Energy Anomalous-Dispersion Studies of Proteins (Section 9); Protein Crystallography (Section 10); Time- and Space-resolved X-Ray Spectroscopy (Section 11); Medical Diagnostic Facility (Section 12); and Transuranium Research Facility (Section 13). The computer systems to be used on the beamlines are also discussed in Section 14 of this document.« less
  • The Argonne 6 GeV synchrotron light source design consists of an electron/positron linac, a fast-cycling 6 GeV synchrotron, and the storage ring itself. The design attributes are presented elsewhere in this conference. Three aspects of the overall design call for special attention in the control system design: First, the operation of a high energy positron accelerator in a fast cycling mode may demand high processing performance and high data throughput rates. Second, the high energy and small beam size projected (100 x 200 microns) will call for high resolution data processing and control precision in many areas. Finally, the necessitymore » to provide independent, orthogonal control for each of up to 32 insertion device light beams both from the point of view of the experimental requirements and from the need to remove the effects of component vibration will require dedicated, high performance processors.« less
  • The Argonne National Laboratory Synchrotron Light Source Storage Ring is designed to have a natural emittance of 6.5 X 10/sup -9/ m for circulating 6-GeV positrons. Thirty of the 32 long straight sections, each 6.5-m long, will be available for synchrotron light insertion devices. A circulating positron current of 300 mA can be injected in about 8 min. from a booster synchrotron operating with a repetition time of 1.2 sec. The booster synchrotron will contain two different rf systems. The lower frequency system (38.97 MHz) will accept positrons from a 360-MeV linac and will accelerate them to 2.25 GeV. Themore » higher frequency system (350.76 MHz) will accelerate the positrons to 6 GeV. The positrons will be produced from a 300-MeV electron beam on a tungsten target.« less
  • A model 6 GeV synchrotron light source is described, and the costs, schedule, and manpower associated with producing such a synthrotron light source are summarized. A program consisting of a two-year pre-construction phase, a five-year construction phase, and a three-year post-construction phase and costing a total of $379.6 million is assumed. (LEW)