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Title: Safe nuclear power for the Third World

Abstract

It is clear that using nuclear power for the generation of electricity is one way of reducing the emissions of CO{sub 2} and other gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect. Equally clear is the fact that the reduction can be magnified by converting domestic, commercial, and industrial power-consuming activities from the direct use of fossil fuel sources to electrical energy. A major area for future progress in limiting CO{sub 2} emissions is in the Third World, where population growth and expectations for a higher social and economic standard of living portend vast increases in future energy use. A number of problems come to mind as one contemplates the widespread expansion of nuclear energy use into the Third World. The authors propose a method involving the marriage of two currently evolving concepts by which nuclear electrical generation can be expanded throughout the world in a manner that will address these problems. The idea is to form multinational independent electric generating companies, or nuclear electric companies (NECs), that would design, build, operate, and service a standardized fleet of nuclear power plants. The plants would be of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) design, now under development at Argonne National Laboratory, and, inmore » particular, a commercial conceptualization of the IFR sponsored by General Electric Company, the Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM).« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. (Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville (USA))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5485448
Report Number(s):
CONF-891103-
Journal ID: ISSN 0003-018X; CODEN: TANSA; TRN: 91-024831
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Transactions of the American Nuclear Society; (United States); Journal Volume: 60; Conference: Winter meeting of the American Nuclear Society (ANS) and nuclear power and technology exhibit, San Francisco, CA (United States), 26-30 Nov 1989
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; ENERGY POLICY; EARTH ATMOSPHERE; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; NUCLEAR POWER; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; REACTOR SAFETY; ANL; CAPITALIZED COST; COMMERCIALIZATION; DEMONSTRATION PROGRAMS; DESIGN; ELECTRIC UTILITIES; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; FABRICATION; FOSSIL FUELS; HUMAN POPULATIONS; IFR REACTOR; MODULAR STRUCTURES; PLANNING; PROLIFERATION; RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT; REACTOR CORES; COST; ENERGY SOURCES; EPITHERMAL REACTORS; EXPERIMENTAL REACTORS; FAST REACTORS; FUELS; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; MANAGEMENT; NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; POPULATIONS; POWER; PUBLIC UTILITIES; REACTOR COMPONENTS; REACTORS; RESEARCH AND TEST REACTORS; SAFETY; US AEC; US DOE; US ERDA; US ORGANIZATIONS; WASTE MANAGEMENT; ZERO POWER REACTORS; 290600* - Energy Planning & Policy- Nuclear Energy; 293000 - Energy Planning & Policy- Policy, Legislation, & Regulation; 220900 - Nuclear Reactor Technology- Reactor Safety; 220500 - Nuclear Reactor Technology- Environmental Aspects; 210500 - Power Reactors, Breeding; 540120 - Environment, Atmospheric- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (1990-); 010900 - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Environmental Aspects

Citation Formats

Johnson, W.R., Lyon, C.F., and Redick, J.R. Safe nuclear power for the Third World. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Johnson, W.R., Lyon, C.F., & Redick, J.R. Safe nuclear power for the Third World. United States.
Johnson, W.R., Lyon, C.F., and Redick, J.R. Wed . "Safe nuclear power for the Third World". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5485448,
title = {Safe nuclear power for the Third World},
author = {Johnson, W.R. and Lyon, C.F. and Redick, J.R.},
abstractNote = {It is clear that using nuclear power for the generation of electricity is one way of reducing the emissions of CO{sub 2} and other gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect. Equally clear is the fact that the reduction can be magnified by converting domestic, commercial, and industrial power-consuming activities from the direct use of fossil fuel sources to electrical energy. A major area for future progress in limiting CO{sub 2} emissions is in the Third World, where population growth and expectations for a higher social and economic standard of living portend vast increases in future energy use. A number of problems come to mind as one contemplates the widespread expansion of nuclear energy use into the Third World. The authors propose a method involving the marriage of two currently evolving concepts by which nuclear electrical generation can be expanded throughout the world in a manner that will address these problems. The idea is to form multinational independent electric generating companies, or nuclear electric companies (NECs), that would design, build, operate, and service a standardized fleet of nuclear power plants. The plants would be of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) design, now under development at Argonne National Laboratory, and, in particular, a commercial conceptualization of the IFR sponsored by General Electric Company, the Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM).},
doi = {},
journal = {Transactions of the American Nuclear Society; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 60,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 1989},
month = {Wed Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 1989}
}

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