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Title: Minimum detectable activity and false alarm rate relationships for alpha continuous air monitors

Abstract

The U.S. Department of Energy rule for Occupational Radiation Protection (10 CFR Part 835, December 1993) and the DOE Radiological Control Manual (the RCM) (DOE/EH-0256T, Rev. 1, April 1994) require the use of continuous air monitors (CAMs) in normally occupied areas where an individual is likely to be exposed to a concentration of airborne radioactivity exceeding the derived air concentration (DAC) or where there is a need to alert potentially exposed individuals to unexpected increases in airborne radioactivity levels. The DAC is the airborne concentration that equals the annual limit on intake divided by the volume of air breathed by an average worker for a working year of 2000 h (assuming a breathing volume of 2400 m{sup 3}). It is equivalent to the airborne concentration to which a worker could be exposed for an entire working year (2000 h) without exceeding the allowable annual limit on intake. The rule and the RCM further require that real-time air monitors have an alarm capability and sufficient sensitivity to alert potentially exposed individuals that immediate action is necessary in order to minimize or terminate inhalation exposures. The RCM also recommends that real-time air monitors should be capable of measuring 1 DAC when averagedmore » over 8 h (8 DAC-h) under laboratory conditions. In response to these recommendations, we are developing procedures for determining the basic sensitivity of alpha CAMs under laboratory conditions and for documenting practical alarm set points for routine use of CAMs under a range of radon and thoron concentrations.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.
OSTI Identifier:
54787
Report Number(s):
ITRI-144
ON: DE95007526; TRN: 95:012732
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-76EV01013
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Nov 1994; Related Information: Is Part Of Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute annual report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994; Belinsky, S.A.; Hoover, M.D.; Bradley, P.L. [eds.]; PB: 211 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; 29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; RADIATION MONITORS; ALARM SYSTEMS; SENSITIVITY; RADIOACTIVE AEROSOLS; MAXIMUM INHALATION QUANTITY; ALPHA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; AEROSOL MONITORING; PROGRESS REPORT

Citation Formats

Hoover, M.D., and Newton, G.J. Minimum detectable activity and false alarm rate relationships for alpha continuous air monitors. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Hoover, M.D., & Newton, G.J. Minimum detectable activity and false alarm rate relationships for alpha continuous air monitors. United States.
Hoover, M.D., and Newton, G.J. Tue . "Minimum detectable activity and false alarm rate relationships for alpha continuous air monitors". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_54787,
title = {Minimum detectable activity and false alarm rate relationships for alpha continuous air monitors},
author = {Hoover, M.D. and Newton, G.J.},
abstractNote = {The U.S. Department of Energy rule for Occupational Radiation Protection (10 CFR Part 835, December 1993) and the DOE Radiological Control Manual (the RCM) (DOE/EH-0256T, Rev. 1, April 1994) require the use of continuous air monitors (CAMs) in normally occupied areas where an individual is likely to be exposed to a concentration of airborne radioactivity exceeding the derived air concentration (DAC) or where there is a need to alert potentially exposed individuals to unexpected increases in airborne radioactivity levels. The DAC is the airborne concentration that equals the annual limit on intake divided by the volume of air breathed by an average worker for a working year of 2000 h (assuming a breathing volume of 2400 m{sup 3}). It is equivalent to the airborne concentration to which a worker could be exposed for an entire working year (2000 h) without exceeding the allowable annual limit on intake. The rule and the RCM further require that real-time air monitors have an alarm capability and sufficient sensitivity to alert potentially exposed individuals that immediate action is necessary in order to minimize or terminate inhalation exposures. The RCM also recommends that real-time air monitors should be capable of measuring 1 DAC when averaged over 8 h (8 DAC-h) under laboratory conditions. In response to these recommendations, we are developing procedures for determining the basic sensitivity of alpha CAMs under laboratory conditions and for documenting practical alarm set points for routine use of CAMs under a range of radon and thoron concentrations.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 1994},
month = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 1994}
}

Technical Report:
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