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Title: Economic implications of substituting plant oils for diesel fuel. Volume 2. Final report

Abstract

This study of expected economic impacts of substituting plant oils for diesel fuel consisted of two components: (1) analysis of oilseed production and oilseed crushing capacity in the US and Texas and (2) simulation of impacts on US cropping patterns, crop prices, producer rent, and consumer surplus. The primary oilseed crops considered were soybeans, cottonseed, sunflowers, and peanuts. 19 references, 2 figures, 14 tables.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Texas A and M Univ., College Station (USA). Dept. of Agricultural Economics
OSTI Identifier:
5478225
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5478225; Legacy ID: DE84900428
Report Number(s):
TENRAC/EDF-110-Vol.2
ON: DE84900428
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 09 BIOMASS FUELS; 10 SYNTHETIC FUELS; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; COTTONSEED OIL; FUEL SUBSTITUTION; ECONOMIC IMPACT; PEANUT OIL; SOYBEAN OIL; VEGETABLE OILS; CROPS; DIESEL FUELS; ECONOMIC ANALYSIS; PRICES; SIMULATION; SUNFLOWERS; SUPPLY AND DEMAND; TEXAS; ECONOMICS; ESTERS; FEDERAL REGION VI; LIPIDS; NORTH AMERICA; OILS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OTHER ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; PLANTS; TRIGLYCERIDES; USA 530100* -- Environmental-Social Aspects of Energy Technologies-- Social & Economic Studies-- (-1989); 140504 -- Solar Energy Conversion-- Biomass Production & Conversion-- (-1989); 090100 -- Hydrocarbon Fuels-- (-1989); 330800 -- Emission Control-- Alternative Fuels; 299003 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Unconventional Sources & Power Generation-- Other-- (-1989); 290200 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Economics & Sociology

Citation Formats

Griffin, R.C., Collins, G.S., Lacewell, R.D., and Chang, H.C. Economic implications of substituting plant oils for diesel fuel. Volume 2. Final report. United States: N. p., 1983. Web.
Griffin, R.C., Collins, G.S., Lacewell, R.D., & Chang, H.C. Economic implications of substituting plant oils for diesel fuel. Volume 2. Final report. United States.
Griffin, R.C., Collins, G.S., Lacewell, R.D., and Chang, H.C. Mon . "Economic implications of substituting plant oils for diesel fuel. Volume 2. Final report". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5478225,
title = {Economic implications of substituting plant oils for diesel fuel. Volume 2. Final report},
author = {Griffin, R.C. and Collins, G.S. and Lacewell, R.D. and Chang, H.C.},
abstractNote = {This study of expected economic impacts of substituting plant oils for diesel fuel consisted of two components: (1) analysis of oilseed production and oilseed crushing capacity in the US and Texas and (2) simulation of impacts on US cropping patterns, crop prices, producer rent, and consumer surplus. The primary oilseed crops considered were soybeans, cottonseed, sunflowers, and peanuts. 19 references, 2 figures, 14 tables.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1983},
month = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1983}
}

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  • A regional field crop and national livestock econometric model (TECHSIM) was used to examine the impacts of diverting plant oils (cottonseed and soybeans) to use as a diesel fuel replacement. Two scenarios which represented a five and ten percent replacement of agriculture's diesel fuel use by plant oils were simulated. Producers shift into cotton and soybean production and out of corn, small grains and grain sorghum. Significant price shifts were estimated for cottonseed and soybean meal and oil, fed beef, pork and sheep. The annual reduction in social well being was estimated at about $.5 billion and over $1 billionmore » for replacement of 5 and 10 percent, respectively of agricultural's diesel fuel use by plant oils. 2 figures, 4 tables.« less
  • The annual total yield of plant oils in the US is about 3.7 billion gallons. Diesel use by agriculture is about 2.0 billion gallons annually and is growing rapidly relative to gasoline use. Based on these amounts, plant oils could satisfy agriculture's diesel fuel requirements during the near future. However, diversion of large quantities of plant oils for such purposes would have dramatic impacts on plant oil prices and be reflected in numerous adjustments throughout agriculture and other sectors of the economy. The competitive position of sunflowers for plant oil production in Texas was analyzed. In those regions with amore » cotton alternative, sunflowers were not, for the most part, economically competitive. However, sunflower production is competitive with grain sorghum in certain cases. To develop a meaningful production base for oilseed crops in Texas, yields need to be improved or increases in oilseed prices relative to cotton must take place. This implies some limitations for the potential of Texas to produce large quantities of plant oils.« less
  • This project includes evaluations of cottonseed oils and sunflower oil ethyl esters in both direct injection and precombustion chamber design diesel engines. It is one part of a major research program at Texas A and M University to study the technical feasibility of using plant oils or animal fats as alternative diesel fuels. Goals for the overall program are to define physical and chemical characteristics and optimum processing methods required for high quality alternative diesel fuels from plant or animal oils and to investigate effects of engine design on alternative fuel performance. This report describes work done under the currentmore » contract which includes evaluations of cottonseed oils and sunflower oil interesterified with ethanol as alternative diesel fuels. 15 figures, 18 tables.« less
  • This volume presents a synthesis of developments in the economic theory of uncertainty and a discussion of the implications of the theory for energy supply. Chapter 1 is an overview of the economics of uncertainty with precise definitions of basic concepts such as the meaning of risk, risk aversion, and insurance. Several propositions concerning the efficient spreading of risk and the possible mechanisms for risk-bearing are described. There is also a discussion of the efficiency with which the market provides insurance and other mechanisms for absorbing risks. Detailed applications of the economics of uncertainty to particular areas of energy supplymore » are described in Volume III, but several general applications are suggested in this volume. Chapter 2 examines the effects of uncertainty on decisions of firms and industrial market structure. The results of this analysis cast doubt on several propositions of classical microeconomics. For example, firms may not choose the production technique with minimum cost in the presence of risk. There are many problems that require a wider analysis than a study of an industry in isolation. The desirability of an action taken in one sector of the economy may depend on the response of the rest of the economy. The study of these economic repercussions is the subject of general equilibrium analysis. Chapter 3 surveys the economic analysis of uncertainty within a general equilibrium framework. Chapter 4 is concerned with analyzing what is meant by information and its economic value. The determinants of the value of information are discussed, and a careful distinction is drawn between the value of information for private use and its value to society.« less