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Title: Extraction of water labeled with oxygen 15 during single-capillary transit. Influence of blood pressure, osmolarity, and blood-brain barrier damage

Abstract

By external detection, the influence of arterial blood pressure (BP), osmolarity, and cold-induced blood-brain barrier damage was assessed on the extraction of water labeled with oxygen 15 during single-capillary transit in the rat. There was an inverse relation between arterial BP and extraction that was attributable to the influence of arterial BP on cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the relation between CBF and extraction. Neither arterial BP nor osmolarity of the injected bolus had any direct effect on extraction of water 15O, signifying that the diffusional exchange component (determined by blood flow) of extraction greatly surpasses the convection flow contribution by hydrostatic or osmotic forces. Damage to the blood-brain barrier did not change its permeability to water.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5475949
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Arch. Neurol.; (United States); Journal Volume: 38:9
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER; PHYSIOLOGY; CAPILLARIES; OXYGEN 15; ISOTOPE APPLICATIONS; BLOOD FLOW; BLOOD PRESSURE; CEREBRUM; LABELLED COMPOUNDS; PERMEABILITY; RATS; WATER; ANIMALS; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-PLUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BLOOD VESSELS; BODY; BRAIN; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM; EVEN-ODD NUCLEI; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; ISOTOPES; LIGHT NUCLEI; MAMMALS; MINUTES LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; NERVOUS SYSTEM; NUCLEI; ORGANS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; OXYGEN ISOTOPES; RADIOISOTOPES; RODENTS; VERTEBRATES; 551001* - Physiological Systems- Tracer Techniques

Citation Formats

Go, K.G., Lammertsma, A.A., Paans, A.M., Vaalburg, W., and Woldring, M.G. Extraction of water labeled with oxygen 15 during single-capillary transit. Influence of blood pressure, osmolarity, and blood-brain barrier damage. United States: N. p., 1981. Web. doi:10.1001/archneur.1981.00510090075009.
Go, K.G., Lammertsma, A.A., Paans, A.M., Vaalburg, W., & Woldring, M.G. Extraction of water labeled with oxygen 15 during single-capillary transit. Influence of blood pressure, osmolarity, and blood-brain barrier damage. United States. doi:10.1001/archneur.1981.00510090075009.
Go, K.G., Lammertsma, A.A., Paans, A.M., Vaalburg, W., and Woldring, M.G. Tue . "Extraction of water labeled with oxygen 15 during single-capillary transit. Influence of blood pressure, osmolarity, and blood-brain barrier damage". United States. doi:10.1001/archneur.1981.00510090075009.
@article{osti_5475949,
title = {Extraction of water labeled with oxygen 15 during single-capillary transit. Influence of blood pressure, osmolarity, and blood-brain barrier damage},
author = {Go, K.G. and Lammertsma, A.A. and Paans, A.M. and Vaalburg, W. and Woldring, M.G.},
abstractNote = {By external detection, the influence of arterial blood pressure (BP), osmolarity, and cold-induced blood-brain barrier damage was assessed on the extraction of water labeled with oxygen 15 during single-capillary transit in the rat. There was an inverse relation between arterial BP and extraction that was attributable to the influence of arterial BP on cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the relation between CBF and extraction. Neither arterial BP nor osmolarity of the injected bolus had any direct effect on extraction of water 15O, signifying that the diffusional exchange component (determined by blood flow) of extraction greatly surpasses the convection flow contribution by hydrostatic or osmotic forces. Damage to the blood-brain barrier did not change its permeability to water.},
doi = {10.1001/archneur.1981.00510090075009},
journal = {Arch. Neurol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 38:9,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1981},
month = {Tue Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1981}
}
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