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Title: Life state response to environmental crisis: the case of the Love Canal, Niagara Falls, New York

Abstract

This thesis explored the differences between two life stages - young and old - in perceiving and responding to man-made environmental disaster, as well as the support resources utilized to cope with disaster - personal, familial/friendship, and organizational. Because of the characteristics of man-made environmental disaster, and because of the different conditions of life and constructions of reality of older and younger families, it was expected that definitions of the situation would vary by life stage and locus of control - authoritative and personal. The research took place in the Love Canal neighborhood of Niagara Falls, New York. Fifty-eight families were interviewed in the fall of 1978, and thirty-nine of these families were reinterviewed in the spring of 1979. Interviews were tape recorded, transcribed, and coded. The data were presented in contingency tables and interview excerpts. The interview schedules elicited information of perception of impact, responses to impact, and the utilization of support resources. In an authoritative locus of control situation, the major findings were that both older and younger families perceived impact, that older families were slightly less disrupted, that younger families relied on organizational and familial/friendship support resources, and that older families relied on familial/friendship support resources.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
State Univ. of New York, Buffalo (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5467128
Resource Type:
Thesis/Dissertation
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Thesis (Ph. D.)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; ATTITUDES; LAND POLLUTION; NEW YORK; ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY; WATER POLLUTION; AGE DEPENDENCE; DATA ANALYSIS; FEDERAL REGION II; NORTH AMERICA; POLLUTION; USA 290300* -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Environment, Health, & Safety; 510200 -- Environment, Terrestrial-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (-1989); 520200 -- Environment, Aquatic-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Masters, S.K.. Life state response to environmental crisis: the case of the Love Canal, Niagara Falls, New York. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Masters, S.K.. Life state response to environmental crisis: the case of the Love Canal, Niagara Falls, New York. United States.
Masters, S.K.. 1986. "Life state response to environmental crisis: the case of the Love Canal, Niagara Falls, New York". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5467128,
title = {Life state response to environmental crisis: the case of the Love Canal, Niagara Falls, New York},
author = {Masters, S.K.},
abstractNote = {This thesis explored the differences between two life stages - young and old - in perceiving and responding to man-made environmental disaster, as well as the support resources utilized to cope with disaster - personal, familial/friendship, and organizational. Because of the characteristics of man-made environmental disaster, and because of the different conditions of life and constructions of reality of older and younger families, it was expected that definitions of the situation would vary by life stage and locus of control - authoritative and personal. The research took place in the Love Canal neighborhood of Niagara Falls, New York. Fifty-eight families were interviewed in the fall of 1978, and thirty-nine of these families were reinterviewed in the spring of 1979. Interviews were tape recorded, transcribed, and coded. The data were presented in contingency tables and interview excerpts. The interview schedules elicited information of perception of impact, responses to impact, and the utilization of support resources. In an authoritative locus of control situation, the major findings were that both older and younger families perceived impact, that older families were slightly less disrupted, that younger families relied on organizational and familial/friendship support resources, and that older families relied on familial/friendship support resources.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month = 1
}

Thesis/Dissertation:
Other availability
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  • The Love Canal site is located in the southeast corner of the city of Niagara Falls and is approximately one-quarter mile north of the Niagara River. The canal was one of two initial excavations designed to provide inexpensive hydroelectric power for industrial development around the turn of the 20th century. Hooker Chemicals and Plastics Corporation (Hooker), now Occidental Chemical Corporation, disposed of over 21,000 tons of chemical wastes, including dioxin-tainted trichlorophenols, into Love Canal between 1942 and 1953. In the mid to late 1970s, continued periods of high precipitation contributed to water accumulation in the disposal area causing chemically-contaminated leachatemore » to be carried to the surface and into contact with residential-basement foundations. Also, dioxin and other contaminants migrated from Love Canal to the sewers which have outfalls to nearby creeks. The remedial program at Love Canal has been extensive and has occurred in two phases. Approximately 30,400 cu yd - 40,900 cu yd of creek and sewer sediments are contaminated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, commonly referred to as dioxin.« less
  • This investigation reveals factors affecting decisions on environment, and provides some understanding of the decision process. The framework provides a vocabulary that assists communication about environmental policy and management. The framework is used to explore allegations against the Wetlands Act. The study reveals that the role of environmental managers in the Act was limited by their general absence from the policy process. Their contribution was not based on ecological science, but rather on popularized ecology. Environmental managers tend to confuse facts and values in the policy process and are uneasy with value balancing that occurs in policy making. No policymore » analysis was undertaken to establish the fact on wetlands. In order to improve environmental policy, environmental managers ought to base their input into society's decision process on ecological science and make clear the limits of their knowledge. They should be trained in ecology. Environmental managers also need a greater exposure to social sciences and the policy arena, and to be trained in policy analysis. A curriculum for training environmental managers in line with recommendations is outlined.« less
  • The Love Canal (93rd Street) site is an inactive hazardous waste site located in Niagara Falls, New York. The 19-acre 93rd Street School site, one of several operable units for the Love Canal Superfund site, is the focus of the Record of Decision (ROD). The fill material is reported to contain fly ash and BHC (a pesticide) waste. The ROD amends the 1988 ROD, and addresses final remediation of onsite contaminated soil through excavation and offsite disposal. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil are VOCs including toluene and xylenes; other organics including PAHs and pesticides; and metals includingmore » arsenic, chromium, and lead.« less
  • The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) announce this Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD) to explain modifications to the selected remedy for the final destruction and disposal of Love Canal dioxin-contaminated sewer and creek sediments. These modifications are embodied in proposed changes to a partial consent decree between the United States and the State of New York and the Occidental Chemical Corporation (OCC) in the United States District Court for the Western District of New York.
  • This is a study of the work worlds of energy-resource producers in the State of Wyoming. It is based on assumptions that (1) what people perceive as real influences their behavior in the social world, (2) conflicting behavior among groups of people can frequently be traced to conflicting perceptions of social reality, and (3) energy-resource development can best be understood as a social process involving groups with differing perceptions of reality. It was determined that energy-resource developers perceive their work, and their place in the social order, differently from those not involved in energy development. They view themselves, in amore » very real sense, as the last bastion of free enterprise. This view lends itself to an automatically antagonistic stance toward those who question the process of energy development as conducted by the industry. The energy developers do not recognize internal contradictions in the process of energy development and have developed a repertoire of responses to defuse critics of criticism. The process of energy-resource development is currently undergoing a crisis of legitimation, with both developers and critics attempting to gain consensus on a particular definition of social reality. This struggle for the dominant definition of reality, and hence for the power to determine the direction of energy development, has led to a fragmented approach to energy-resource development in Wyoming that is detrimental to the social and physical environments.« less