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Title: Neutronic design studies for an unattended, low power reactor

Abstract

The Los Alamos National Laboratory is involved in the design and demonstrations of a small, long-lived nuclear heat and electric power source for potential applications at remote sites where alternate fossil energy systems would not be cost effective. This paper describes the neutronic design analysis that was performed to arrive at two conceptual designs, one using thermoelectric conversion, the other using an organic Rankine cycle. To meet the design objectives and constraints a number of scoping and optimization studies were carried out. The results of calculations of control worths, temperature coefficients of reactivity and fuel depletion effects are reported.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5466591
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-86-1879; CONF-860906-13
ON: DE86011228
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Advances in reactor physics and safety meeting, Saratoga Springs, NY, USA, 17 Sep 1986; Other Information: Portions of this document are illegible in microfiche products
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; GRAPHITE MODERATED REACTORS; DESIGN; REACTOR CORES; REACTOR PHYSICS; POWER REACTORS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; GRAPHITE; HEAT PIPES; POWER RANGE 10-100 KW; RANKINE CYCLE; THERMOELECTRIC CONVERSION; CARBON; CONVERSION; DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; ELEMENTAL MINERALS; ELEMENTS; ENERGY CONVERSION; MINERALS; NONMETALS; PHYSICS; REACTOR COMPONENTS; REACTORS; SIMULATION; THERMODYNAMIC CYCLES; 210300* - Power Reactors, Nonbreeding, Graphite Moderated; 210600 - Power Reactors, Auxiliary, Mobile Package, & Transportable

Citation Formats

Palmer, R.G., and Durkee, J.W. Jr.. Neutronic design studies for an unattended, low power reactor. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Palmer, R.G., & Durkee, J.W. Jr.. Neutronic design studies for an unattended, low power reactor. United States.
Palmer, R.G., and Durkee, J.W. Jr.. Wed . "Neutronic design studies for an unattended, low power reactor". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/5466591.
@article{osti_5466591,
title = {Neutronic design studies for an unattended, low power reactor},
author = {Palmer, R.G. and Durkee, J.W. Jr.},
abstractNote = {The Los Alamos National Laboratory is involved in the design and demonstrations of a small, long-lived nuclear heat and electric power source for potential applications at remote sites where alternate fossil energy systems would not be cost effective. This paper describes the neutronic design analysis that was performed to arrive at two conceptual designs, one using thermoelectric conversion, the other using an organic Rankine cycle. To meet the design objectives and constraints a number of scoping and optimization studies were carried out. The results of calculations of control worths, temperature coefficients of reactivity and fuel depletion effects are reported.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1986},
month = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1986}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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