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Title: Sediment sound velocities from sonobuoys: Arabian fan

Abstract

Eight variable-angle seismic reflection stations in the Arabian Fan, Northwestern Indian Ocean, provided 40 determinations of sound velocity in sediment and sedimentary rock. Sound velocity in the homogeneous, largely terrigenous fan increases smoothly with depth. Regression analysis yielded the velocity-time relationship V (km/s)=1.510+1.863t, where V is instantaneous velocity and t is one-way travel time below the sea floor to 1 s. The velocity-depth function is V (km/s)=1.510+1.200h-0.253h/sup 2/+ 0.034h/sup 3/, where h is subbottom depth in km.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Naval Ocean Systems Center, San Diego, California 92152
OSTI Identifier:
5462299
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Geophys. Res.; (United States); Journal Volume: 85:B2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; SEDIMENTARY ROCKS; SOUND WAVES; SEDIMENTS; ARABIAN SEA; REFLECTION; REGRESSION ANALYSIS; SEA BED; INDIAN OCEAN; MATHEMATICS; ROCKS; SEAS; STATISTICS; SURFACE WATERS; 580500* - Oceanography- (1980-1989)

Citation Formats

Bachman, R.T., and Hamilton, E.L. Sediment sound velocities from sonobuoys: Arabian fan. United States: N. p., 1980. Web. doi:10.1029/JB085iB02p00849.
Bachman, R.T., & Hamilton, E.L. Sediment sound velocities from sonobuoys: Arabian fan. United States. doi:10.1029/JB085iB02p00849.
Bachman, R.T., and Hamilton, E.L. Sun . "Sediment sound velocities from sonobuoys: Arabian fan". United States. doi:10.1029/JB085iB02p00849.
@article{osti_5462299,
title = {Sediment sound velocities from sonobuoys: Arabian fan},
author = {Bachman, R.T. and Hamilton, E.L.},
abstractNote = {Eight variable-angle seismic reflection stations in the Arabian Fan, Northwestern Indian Ocean, provided 40 determinations of sound velocity in sediment and sedimentary rock. Sound velocity in the homogeneous, largely terrigenous fan increases smoothly with depth. Regression analysis yielded the velocity-time relationship V (km/s)=1.510+1.863t, where V is instantaneous velocity and t is one-way travel time below the sea floor to 1 s. The velocity-depth function is V (km/s)=1.510+1.200h-0.253h/sup 2/+ 0.034h/sup 3/, where h is subbottom depth in km.},
doi = {10.1029/JB085iB02p00849},
journal = {J. Geophys. Res.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 85:B2,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Feb 10 00:00:00 EST 1980},
month = {Sun Feb 10 00:00:00 EST 1980}
}
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