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Title: Small scale production of biofuels: a feasibility assessment

Abstract

Current public policy fails to adequately address one of the most exigent concerns of the agricultural producer: the cost and availability of energy. Specifically, they are interested in energy production alternatives that are feasible and economic for implementation by smaller agricultural producers. After an extended review of much of the available popular and technical literature, as well as conducting interviews with numerous individuals knowledgeable in the field of alternative energy production, the Roosevelt-Custer Regional Council for Development has prepared this preliminary feasibility assessment on the small scale production of biofuels in North Dakota. The production of energy from renewable sources is not commerical; it is reality. Currently, North Dakotan's rely on energy produced from agricultural products to run their automobiles and to heat their homes, as well as to dry the crops on which much of the North Dakota economy depends. Over the next 20 years, this reliance on renewable energy sources is expected to triple. Unfortunately, most of the processes currently used to produce these biofuels are not adaptable for use by the smaller producer/consumer. Today, economics simply preclude the small scale production of biofuels. A deplorable consequence of this lag between demand and technical feasibility is the appearancemore » of the quick-buck consultant. These individuals have not limited their activities to North Dakota but, in fact, they have appeared over the length and breadth of this nation. This report then is an assessment of the feasibility of producing biofuels in North Dakota by the small scale producer. Specific types of biofuels to be critiqued are: alcohol; vegetable oils; biogas/methane; and biomass briquettes.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5461804
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5461804
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Related Information: NP--1903552
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; BIOMASS; PRODUCTION; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; ALCOHOL FUELS; BRIQUETS; COMMERCIALIZATION; FARMS; FEASIBILITY STUDIES; FUELS; METHANE; NORTH DAKOTA; ALKANES; ENERGY SOURCES; FEDERAL REGION VIII; HYDROCARBONS; NORTH AMERICA; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; SOLID FUELS; SYNTHETIC FUELS; USA 140504* -- Solar Energy Conversion-- Biomass Production & Conversion-- (-1989); 090122 -- Hydrocarbon Fuels-- Preparation from Wastes or Biomass-- (1976-1989); 090222 -- Alcohol Fuels-- Preparation from Wastes or Biomass-- (1976-1989)

Citation Formats

Geyler, J. Small scale production of biofuels: a feasibility assessment. United States: N. p., 1980. Web.
Geyler, J. Small scale production of biofuels: a feasibility assessment. United States.
Geyler, J. Tue . "Small scale production of biofuels: a feasibility assessment". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5461804,
title = {Small scale production of biofuels: a feasibility assessment},
author = {Geyler, J.},
abstractNote = {Current public policy fails to adequately address one of the most exigent concerns of the agricultural producer: the cost and availability of energy. Specifically, they are interested in energy production alternatives that are feasible and economic for implementation by smaller agricultural producers. After an extended review of much of the available popular and technical literature, as well as conducting interviews with numerous individuals knowledgeable in the field of alternative energy production, the Roosevelt-Custer Regional Council for Development has prepared this preliminary feasibility assessment on the small scale production of biofuels in North Dakota. The production of energy from renewable sources is not commerical; it is reality. Currently, North Dakotan's rely on energy produced from agricultural products to run their automobiles and to heat their homes, as well as to dry the crops on which much of the North Dakota economy depends. Over the next 20 years, this reliance on renewable energy sources is expected to triple. Unfortunately, most of the processes currently used to produce these biofuels are not adaptable for use by the smaller producer/consumer. Today, economics simply preclude the small scale production of biofuels. A deplorable consequence of this lag between demand and technical feasibility is the appearance of the quick-buck consultant. These individuals have not limited their activities to North Dakota but, in fact, they have appeared over the length and breadth of this nation. This report then is an assessment of the feasibility of producing biofuels in North Dakota by the small scale producer. Specific types of biofuels to be critiqued are: alcohol; vegetable oils; biogas/methane; and biomass briquettes.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1980},
month = {Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1980}
}

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  • Current public policy fails to adequately address one of the most exigent concerns of the agricultural producer: the cost and availability of energy. Specifically, they are interested in energy production alternatives that are feasible and economic for implementation by smaller agricultural producers. After a extended review of much of the available popular and technical literature, as well as conducting interviews with numerous individuals knowledgeable in the field of alternative energy production, the Roosevelt-Custer Regional Council for Development has prepared this preliminary feasibility assessment on the small scale production of biofuels in North Dakota. The production of energy from renewable sourcesmore » is not chimerical; it is reality. Currently, North Dakotan's rely on energy produced from agricultural products to run their automobiles and to heat their homes, as well as to dry the crops on which much of the North Dakota economy depends. Over the next 20 years, this reliance on renewable energy sources is expected to triple. Unfortunately, most of the processes currently used to produce these biofuels are not adaptable for use by the smaller producer/consumer. Today, economics simply preclude the small scale production of biofuels. A deplorable consequence of this lag between demand and technical feasibility is the appearance of the quick-buck consultant. These individuals have not limited their activities to North Dakota but, in fact, they have appeared over the length and breadth of this Nation. This report then is an assessment of the feasibility of producing biofuels in North Dakota by the small scale producer. Specific types of biofuels to be critiqued are: alcohol; vegetable oils; biogas/methane; and biomass briquettes.« less
  • The book is structured to guide the reader through the process of developing and constructing a small hydro project from the hydrologic resource assessment, through physical site design, turbine-generator selection, economics, and environmental impact, according to the editor, and includes case studies. This book therefore serves both as a technical primer and as a guidebook for energy specialists seeking to assess hydropower resource opportunities. It can also serve as a university-level text in civil engineering. Chapters cover hydrologic analyses, site development, dams and reservoirs, turbines, electrical equipment, environmental impact, regulation, opportunities in developing countries, economic and financial feasibility and systemmore » design. The text, while containing detailed engineering on small hydro, is also written for the nontechnical reader. It includes simple definitions of basic hydro concepts.« less
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