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Title: Time dependent inhibition of xanthine oxidase in irradiated solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate

Abstract

The xanthine oxidase catalyzed oxidation of hypoxanthine was followed by monitoring the formation of uric acid at 290 nm. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase occurs in aqueous solutions of folic acid methotrexate and aminopterin. These compounds are known to dissociate upon exposure to ultraviolet light resulting in the formation of their respective 6-formylpteridine derivatives. The relative rates of dissociation were monitored spectrophotometrically by determining the absorbance of their 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatives at 500 nm. When aqueous solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate were exposed to uv light, a direct correlation was observed between the concentrations of the 6-formylpteridine derivatives existing in solution and the ability of these solutions to inhibit xanthine oxidase. The relative potency of the respective photolysis products were estimated.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. (Department of Chemistry, Seattle University, WA (USA))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5459806
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physiological Chemistry and Physics and Medical NMR; (United States); Journal Volume: 22:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; HYPOXANTHINE; METABOLISM; OXIDOREDUCTASES; CHEMICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; AMINOPTERIN; FOLIC ACID; METHOTREXATE; PHOTOLYSIS; SPECTROPHOTOMETRY; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; AMINES; AMINO ACIDS; ANTIMETABOLITES; AROMATICS; AZAARENES; CARBOXYLIC ACIDS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; DECOMPOSITION; DRUGS; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; ENZYMES; HEMATINICS; HEMATOLOGIC AGENTS; HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS; HYDROXY COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTIONS; PTERIDINES; PURINES; RADIATION EFFECTS; RADIATIONS; VITAMIN B GROUP; VITAMINS 560120* -- Radiation Effects on Biochemicals, Cells, & Tissue Culture

Citation Formats

Robinson, K., Pilot, T.F., and Meany, J.E. Time dependent inhibition of xanthine oxidase in irradiated solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate. United States: N. p., 1990. Web.
Robinson, K., Pilot, T.F., & Meany, J.E. Time dependent inhibition of xanthine oxidase in irradiated solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate. United States.
Robinson, K., Pilot, T.F., and Meany, J.E. 1990. "Time dependent inhibition of xanthine oxidase in irradiated solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5459806,
title = {Time dependent inhibition of xanthine oxidase in irradiated solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate},
author = {Robinson, K. and Pilot, T.F. and Meany, J.E.},
abstractNote = {The xanthine oxidase catalyzed oxidation of hypoxanthine was followed by monitoring the formation of uric acid at 290 nm. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase occurs in aqueous solutions of folic acid methotrexate and aminopterin. These compounds are known to dissociate upon exposure to ultraviolet light resulting in the formation of their respective 6-formylpteridine derivatives. The relative rates of dissociation were monitored spectrophotometrically by determining the absorbance of their 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatives at 500 nm. When aqueous solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate were exposed to uv light, a direct correlation was observed between the concentrations of the 6-formylpteridine derivatives existing in solution and the ability of these solutions to inhibit xanthine oxidase. The relative potency of the respective photolysis products were estimated.},
doi = {},
journal = {Physiological Chemistry and Physics and Medical NMR; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 22:2,
place = {United States},
year = 1990,
month = 1
}
  • Hydroxyl radical scavengers and xanthine oxidase inhibitors protect cultured bovine pulmonary endothelial cells (BPAEC) from lytic injury by the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We hypothesized that exposure of BPAEC to cytotoxic concentrations of LPS activated intracellular xanthine oxidase, and that intracellular iron-dependent hydroxyl radical formation (a Fenton reaction) ensued, resulting in cell lysis. To test this, the protective effects of deferoxamine against H2O2 and LPS-induced cytotoxicity to BPAEC was assessed by 51Cr release. Preincubation with 0.4 mM deferoxamine conferred 67 +/- 15% (mean +/- SE) protection from LPS-induced cytotoxicity but 48 h of preincubation were required to induce significant protection. Significantmore » protection form a classical Fenton reaction model, injury by 50 microM H2O2, could be induced by a 1-h preincubation with a 0.4 mM deferoxamine. The dissociated time course suggested that deferoxamine might work by different mechanisms in these models. The effects of LPS and deferoxamine on BPAEC-associated xanthine oxidase (XO) and xanthine dehydrogenase (XD) activity were assessed using a spectrofluorophotometric measurement of the conversion of pterin to isoxanthopterin. BPAEC had 106 +/- 7 microU/mg XD+XO activity; XO activity constituted 48 +/- 1% of total XO+XD activity. LPS at a cytotoxic concentration did not alter XO, XD, or percent XO. Deferoxamine had striking proportional inhibitory effects on XO and XD in intact cells. XO+XD activity fell to 6 +/- 1% of control levels during a 48-h exposure of BPAEC to deferoxamine. Deferoxamine did not inhibit XO+XD ex vivo.« less
  • Ischemic-reperfusion lung injury is a factor potentially limiting the usefulness of distant organ procurement for heart-lung transplantation. Toxic oxygen metabolites are considered a major etiologic factor in reperfusion injury. Although oxygen-free radicals may be generated by many mechanisms, we investigated the role of xanthine oxidase in this injury process by using lodoxamide, a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, to inhibit ischemic-reperfusion injury in an isolated rat lung model. Isolated rat lungs were perfused with physiologic salt solution (PSS) osmotically stabilized with Ficoll until circulating blood elements were nondetectable in the pulmonary venous effluent. Lungs were rendered ischemic by interrupting ventilation and perfusionmore » for 2 hr at 37/sup 0/C. After the ischemic interval, the lungs were reperfused with whole blood and lung injury was determined by measuring the accumulation of /sup 125/I-bovine serum albumin in lung parenchyma and alveolar lavage fluid as well as by gravimetric measurements. Lung effluent was collected immediately pre- and postischemia for analysis of uric acid by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Lodoxamide (1 mM) caused significant attenuation of postischemic lung injury. Uric acid levels in the lung effluent confirmed inhibition of xanthine oxidase. Protection from injury was not complete, however, implying that additional mechanisms may contribute to ischemic-reperfusion injury in the lung.« less
  • Xanthine oxidase is a molybdenum-containing enzyme catalyzing the hydroxylation of a sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon in a broad range of aromatic heterocycles and aldehydes. Crystal structures of the bovine enzyme in complex with the physiological substrate hypoxanthine at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution and the chemotherapeutic agent 6-mercaptopurine at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution have been determined, showing in each case two alternate orientations of substrate in the two active sites of the crystallographic asymmetric unit. One orientation is such that it is expected to yield hydroxylation at C-2 of substrate, yielding xanthine. The other suggests hydroxylation at C-8 to give 6,8-dihydroxypurine, a putative productmore » not previously thought to be generated by the enzyme. Kinetic experiments demonstrate that >98% of hypoxanthine is hydroxylated at C-2 rather than C-8, indicating that the second crystallographically observed orientation is significantly less catalytically effective than the former. Theoretical calculations suggest that enzyme selectivity for the C-2 over C-8 of hypoxanthine is largely due to differences in the intrinsic reactivity of the two sites. For the orientation of hypoxanthine with C-2 proximal to the molybdenum center, the disposition of substrate in the active site is such that Arg880 and Glu802, previous shown to be catalytically important for the conversion of xanthine to uric acid, play similar roles in hydroxylation at C-2 as at C-8. Contrary to the literature, we find that 6,8-dihydroxypurine is effectively converted to uric acid by xanthine oxidase.« less