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Title: Microstrip antenna modeling and measurement at high frequencies

Abstract

This report addresses the task C(i) of the Proposal for Microstrip Antenna Modeling and Measurement at High Frequencies by the writer, July 1985. The task is: Assess the advantages and disadvantages of the three computational approaches outlined in the Proposal, including any difficulties to be resolved and an estimate of the time required to implement each approach. The three approaches are (1) Finite Difference, (2) Sommerfeld-GTD-MOM, and (3) Surface Intergral Equations - MOM. These are discussed in turn.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5457668
Report Number(s):
UCID-20788
ON: DE86014404
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; ANTENNAS; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; PERFORMANCE; EFFICIENCY; FINITE DIFFERENCE METHOD; IMPEDANCE; ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT; EQUIPMENT; ITERATIVE METHODS; NUMERICAL SOLUTION; 420800* - Engineering- Electronic Circuits & Devices- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Bevensee, R.M.. Microstrip antenna modeling and measurement at high frequencies. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Bevensee, R.M.. Microstrip antenna modeling and measurement at high frequencies. United States.
Bevensee, R.M.. 1986. "Microstrip antenna modeling and measurement at high frequencies". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5457668,
title = {Microstrip antenna modeling and measurement at high frequencies},
author = {Bevensee, R.M.},
abstractNote = {This report addresses the task C(i) of the Proposal for Microstrip Antenna Modeling and Measurement at High Frequencies by the writer, July 1985. The task is: Assess the advantages and disadvantages of the three computational approaches outlined in the Proposal, including any difficulties to be resolved and an estimate of the time required to implement each approach. The three approaches are (1) Finite Difference, (2) Sommerfeld-GTD-MOM, and (3) Surface Intergral Equations - MOM. These are discussed in turn.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month = 4
}

Technical Report:
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