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Title: Airborne Tunable Laser Absorption Spectrometer (ATLAS) instrument characterization: Accuracy of the AASE (Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition) and AAOE (Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment) nitrous oxide data sets

Abstract

ATLAS, the Airborne Tunable Laser Absorption Spectrometer, was used to measure nitrous oxide in the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE) and in the 1989 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE). After the AASE, a detailed study of the ATLAS characteristics was undertaken to quantify the error inherent in the in situ measurement of atmospheric N{sub 2}O. Using the latest calibration of the ATLAS (June 1989) and incorporating the recognized errors arising in the flight environment of ATLAS, the authors have established that for both the AASE and the AAOE most of the acquired N{sub 2}O data sets are accurate to {plus minus}10% (2 sigma). Data from two of the earlier AAOE flights had a larger uncertainty.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. (NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (USA))
  2. (San Jose State Univ., CA (USA))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5456317
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Geophysical Research Letters (American Geophysical Union); (United States); Journal Volume: 17:4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; ACCURACY; NITROUS OXIDE; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; ABSORPTION SPECTRA; ANTARCTICA; ARCTIC REGIONS; ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY; CALIBRATION; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; INFRARED SPECTRA; OZONE LAYER; STRATOSPHERE; ANTARCTIC REGIONS; CHALCOGENIDES; CHEMISTRY; EARTH ATMOSPHERE; EVALUATION; LAYERS; NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; NITROGEN OXIDES; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLAR REGIONS; SPECTRA; SPECTROSCOPY; 540120* - Environment, Atmospheric- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (1990-); 010900 - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Environmental Aspects

Citation Formats

Loewenstein, M., Podolske, J.R., and Strahan, S.E. Airborne Tunable Laser Absorption Spectrometer (ATLAS) instrument characterization: Accuracy of the AASE (Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition) and AAOE (Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment) nitrous oxide data sets. United States: N. p., 1990. Web. doi:10.1029/GL017i004p00481.
Loewenstein, M., Podolske, J.R., & Strahan, S.E. Airborne Tunable Laser Absorption Spectrometer (ATLAS) instrument characterization: Accuracy of the AASE (Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition) and AAOE (Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment) nitrous oxide data sets. United States. doi:10.1029/GL017i004p00481.
Loewenstein, M., Podolske, J.R., and Strahan, S.E. 1990. "Airborne Tunable Laser Absorption Spectrometer (ATLAS) instrument characterization: Accuracy of the AASE (Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition) and AAOE (Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment) nitrous oxide data sets". United States. doi:10.1029/GL017i004p00481.
@article{osti_5456317,
title = {Airborne Tunable Laser Absorption Spectrometer (ATLAS) instrument characterization: Accuracy of the AASE (Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition) and AAOE (Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment) nitrous oxide data sets},
author = {Loewenstein, M. and Podolske, J.R. and Strahan, S.E.},
abstractNote = {ATLAS, the Airborne Tunable Laser Absorption Spectrometer, was used to measure nitrous oxide in the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE) and in the 1989 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE). After the AASE, a detailed study of the ATLAS characteristics was undertaken to quantify the error inherent in the in situ measurement of atmospheric N{sub 2}O. Using the latest calibration of the ATLAS (June 1989) and incorporating the recognized errors arising in the flight environment of ATLAS, the authors have established that for both the AASE and the AAOE most of the acquired N{sub 2}O data sets are accurate to {plus minus}10% (2 sigma). Data from two of the earlier AAOE flights had a larger uncertainty.},
doi = {10.1029/GL017i004p00481},
journal = {Geophysical Research Letters (American Geophysical Union); (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 17:4,
place = {United States},
year = 1990,
month = 3
}
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