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Title: Leaching of radionuclides from decaying blueberry leaves: Relative rate independent of concentration

Abstract

Leaching of radionuclides from decaying vegetation has not been extensively investigated, especially for radionuclides other than {sup 137}Cs. The authors obtained leaves of blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium {times} V. corymbosum) that contained over 25-fold ranges in Se, Cs, and I concentrations, as well as a small quantity of leaves containing detectable U. All were contaminated by way of root uptake. Leaching took place for a period of 1 yr in the laboratory, using leach water from forest litter. Monthly, measurements were made of the radionuclide contents and decaying leaf dry weights. The data conformed to an exponential decay model with two first-order components. In no case did the relative loss rates vary systematically with the initial tissue radionuclide concentrations. Loss rates decreased in the order Cs > I > U > dry wt. > Se. Because of the low leaching rate of Se relative to the loss of dry weight, decaying litter may actually accumulate elements such as Se. Accumulation of radionuclides in litter could have important implications for lateral transport, recycling, and direct incorporation into edible mushrooms.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada))
OSTI Identifier:
5453268
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Environmental Quality; (United States); Journal Volume: 19:3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; BLUEBERRIES; RADIONUCLIDE MIGRATION; CESIUM 134; LEACHING; IODINE 125; SELENIUM 75; URANIUM; BIOLOGICAL ACCUMULATION; CONTAMINATION; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; LEAVES; ROOT ABSORPTION; UPTAKE; ABSORPTION; ACTINIDES; ALKALI METAL ISOTOPES; BERRIES; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-MINUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; CESIUM ISOTOPES; DAYS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; DISSOLUTION; ELECTRON CAPTURE RADIOISOTOPES; ELEMENTS; EVEN-ODD NUCLEI; FOOD; FRUITS; HOURS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; INTERMEDIATE MASS NUCLEI; INTERNAL CONVERSION RADIOISOTOPES; IODINE ISOTOPES; ISOMERIC TRANSI; ISOTOPES; MASS TRANSFER; METALS; NUCLEI; ODD-EVEN NUCLEI; RADIOISOTOPES; SELENIUM ISOTOPES; SEPARATION PROCESSES; 540230* - Environment, Terrestrial- Radioactive Materials Monitoring & Transport- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Sheppard, S.C., and Evenden, W.G.. Leaching of radionuclides from decaying blueberry leaves: Relative rate independent of concentration. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.2134/jeq1990.00472425001900030018x.
Sheppard, S.C., & Evenden, W.G.. Leaching of radionuclides from decaying blueberry leaves: Relative rate independent of concentration. United States. doi:10.2134/jeq1990.00472425001900030018x.
Sheppard, S.C., and Evenden, W.G.. . "Leaching of radionuclides from decaying blueberry leaves: Relative rate independent of concentration". United States. doi:10.2134/jeq1990.00472425001900030018x.
@article{osti_5453268,
title = {Leaching of radionuclides from decaying blueberry leaves: Relative rate independent of concentration},
author = {Sheppard, S.C. and Evenden, W.G.},
abstractNote = {Leaching of radionuclides from decaying vegetation has not been extensively investigated, especially for radionuclides other than {sup 137}Cs. The authors obtained leaves of blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium {times} V. corymbosum) that contained over 25-fold ranges in Se, Cs, and I concentrations, as well as a small quantity of leaves containing detectable U. All were contaminated by way of root uptake. Leaching took place for a period of 1 yr in the laboratory, using leach water from forest litter. Monthly, measurements were made of the radionuclide contents and decaying leaf dry weights. The data conformed to an exponential decay model with two first-order components. In no case did the relative loss rates vary systematically with the initial tissue radionuclide concentrations. Loss rates decreased in the order Cs > I > U > dry wt. > Se. Because of the low leaching rate of Se relative to the loss of dry weight, decaying litter may actually accumulate elements such as Se. Accumulation of radionuclides in litter could have important implications for lateral transport, recycling, and direct incorporation into edible mushrooms.},
doi = {10.2134/jeq1990.00472425001900030018x},
journal = {Journal of Environmental Quality; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 19:3,
place = {United States},
year = {},
month = {}
}