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Title: Geologic setting of hot springs, Trans--Pecos, Texas and adjacent Mexico (Abstract)

Abstract

Hot springs in Trans-Pecos Texas (up to 47/sup 0/C) and adjacent Mexico (up to 80/sup 0/C) are found in a zone along the Rio Grande between the Quitman Mountains and Big Bend National Park. Two distinct types of springs occur: fault controlled and stratigraphically-controlled springs. Most hot springs are on or immediately basinward of major northwest-trending, basin margin normal faults. Other springs occur either along similar normal faults more basinward or those cutting middle Tertiary or older bedrock. Springs of both types are located in topographically low areas. It is probable that thermal waters are present in other localities but discharge into highly permeable bolson sediments without reaching the land surface as springs. Thermal waters are in contact with limestone, siliceous volcanic rocks, bolson deposits composed of volcanic rocks and limestones, and evaporites. Chemical equilibrium of the thermal waters should be controlled by these lithologies. Travertine deposits associated with many springs imply low reservoir temperatures or near-surface reequilibration with limestone. Precipitation of carbonates and flow of thermal waters through siliceous volcanic rocks and evaporites limit the use of silica or Na-K-Ca geothermometers. Recent igneous activity, though common in southern New Mexico, has not been documented in Trans-Pecos Texas and ismore » an unlikely heat source for the thermal waters. Groundwater may be heated by deep circulation along faults in an area of high heat flow due to a thinned crust from Late Cenozoic extension.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Texas, Austin
OSTI Identifier:
5452958
Resource Type:
Conference
Journal Name:
Geol. Soc. Am., Abstr. Programs; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9:1; Conference: 11. annual meeting of the Geological Society of America, South-Central Section, El Paso, TX, USA, 17 Mar 1977
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; HOT SPRINGS; GEOLOGY; MEXICO; TEXAS; GEOLOGIC FAULTS; GEOLOGICAL SURVEYS; LIMESTONE; ROCKS; SANDSTONES; SHALES; STRATIGRAPHY; THERMAL WATERS; CARBONATE ROCKS; GEOLOGIC STRUCTURES; METAMORPHIC ROCKS; NORTH AMERICA; RESERVOIR ROCK; SEDIMENTARY ROCKS; THERMAL SPRINGS; USA; 150201* - Geology & Hydrology of Geothermal Systems- USA- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Henry, C D. Geologic setting of hot springs, Trans--Pecos, Texas and adjacent Mexico (Abstract). United States: N. p., 1977. Web.
Henry, C D. Geologic setting of hot springs, Trans--Pecos, Texas and adjacent Mexico (Abstract). United States.
Henry, C D. Sat . "Geologic setting of hot springs, Trans--Pecos, Texas and adjacent Mexico (Abstract)". United States.
@article{osti_5452958,
title = {Geologic setting of hot springs, Trans--Pecos, Texas and adjacent Mexico (Abstract)},
author = {Henry, C D},
abstractNote = {Hot springs in Trans-Pecos Texas (up to 47/sup 0/C) and adjacent Mexico (up to 80/sup 0/C) are found in a zone along the Rio Grande between the Quitman Mountains and Big Bend National Park. Two distinct types of springs occur: fault controlled and stratigraphically-controlled springs. Most hot springs are on or immediately basinward of major northwest-trending, basin margin normal faults. Other springs occur either along similar normal faults more basinward or those cutting middle Tertiary or older bedrock. Springs of both types are located in topographically low areas. It is probable that thermal waters are present in other localities but discharge into highly permeable bolson sediments without reaching the land surface as springs. Thermal waters are in contact with limestone, siliceous volcanic rocks, bolson deposits composed of volcanic rocks and limestones, and evaporites. Chemical equilibrium of the thermal waters should be controlled by these lithologies. Travertine deposits associated with many springs imply low reservoir temperatures or near-surface reequilibration with limestone. Precipitation of carbonates and flow of thermal waters through siliceous volcanic rocks and evaporites limit the use of silica or Na-K-Ca geothermometers. Recent igneous activity, though common in southern New Mexico, has not been documented in Trans-Pecos Texas and is an unlikely heat source for the thermal waters. Groundwater may be heated by deep circulation along faults in an area of high heat flow due to a thinned crust from Late Cenozoic extension.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/5452958}, journal = {Geol. Soc. Am., Abstr. Programs; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 9:1,
place = {United States},
year = {1977},
month = {1}
}

Conference:
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