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Title: High indoor radon variations and the thermal behavior of eskers

Abstract

Measurements of indoor radon concentrations in houses built on the Pispala esker in the city of Tampere were taken. The objective was to find connections between indoor radon concentrations, esker topography, and meteorological factors. The results show that not only the permeable soil but also subterranean air-flows in the esker strongly affect the indoor radon concentrations. The difference in temperature between the soil air inside the esker and the outdoor air compels the subterranean air to stream between the upper and lower esker areas. In winter, the radon concentrations are amplified in the upper esker areas where air flows out from the esker. In summer, concentrations are amplified in certain slope zones. In addition, wind direction affects the soil air and indoor radon concentrations when hitting the slopes at right angles. Winter-summer concentration ratios are typically in the range of 3-20 in areas with amplified winter concentration, and 0.1-0.5 in areas with amplified summer concentrations. A combination of winter and summer measurements provides the best basis for making mitigation decisions. On eskers special attention must be paid to building technology because of radon. 9 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland)
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
54476
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Health Physics; Journal Volume: 67; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: PBD: Sep 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; RADON; INDOOR AIR CONTAMINATION; SEASONAL VARIATIONS; HOUSES; RADON 222; COMPLEX TERRAIN

Citation Formats

Arvela, H., Voutilainen, A., Honkamaa, T., and Rosenberg, A.. High indoor radon variations and the thermal behavior of eskers. United States: N. p., 1994. Web. doi:10.1097/00004032-199409000-00005.
Arvela, H., Voutilainen, A., Honkamaa, T., & Rosenberg, A.. High indoor radon variations and the thermal behavior of eskers. United States. doi:10.1097/00004032-199409000-00005.
Arvela, H., Voutilainen, A., Honkamaa, T., and Rosenberg, A.. 1994. "High indoor radon variations and the thermal behavior of eskers". United States. doi:10.1097/00004032-199409000-00005.
@article{osti_54476,
title = {High indoor radon variations and the thermal behavior of eskers},
author = {Arvela, H. and Voutilainen, A. and Honkamaa, T. and Rosenberg, A.},
abstractNote = {Measurements of indoor radon concentrations in houses built on the Pispala esker in the city of Tampere were taken. The objective was to find connections between indoor radon concentrations, esker topography, and meteorological factors. The results show that not only the permeable soil but also subterranean air-flows in the esker strongly affect the indoor radon concentrations. The difference in temperature between the soil air inside the esker and the outdoor air compels the subterranean air to stream between the upper and lower esker areas. In winter, the radon concentrations are amplified in the upper esker areas where air flows out from the esker. In summer, concentrations are amplified in certain slope zones. In addition, wind direction affects the soil air and indoor radon concentrations when hitting the slopes at right angles. Winter-summer concentration ratios are typically in the range of 3-20 in areas with amplified winter concentration, and 0.1-0.5 in areas with amplified summer concentrations. A combination of winter and summer measurements provides the best basis for making mitigation decisions. On eskers special attention must be paid to building technology because of radon. 9 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.},
doi = {10.1097/00004032-199409000-00005},
journal = {Health Physics},
number = 3,
volume = 67,
place = {United States},
year = 1994,
month = 9
}
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