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Title: Whole bone marrow irradiation for the treatment of multiple myeloma

Abstract

Nine patients with multiple myeloma were treated with whole bone marrow irradiation. Six had heavily pretreated disease refractory to chemotherapy. Three had stable disease lightly pretreated by chemotherapy. A modification of the ''three and two'' total nodal radiation technique was employed. Although varying and often severe treatment related cytopenia occurred, infectious complications, clinical bleeding, and nonhematalogic complications were minimal. Five of nine patients showed a decrease in monoclonal protein components, and one showed an increase during treatment. These preliminary results indicate that a reduction of tumor cell burden may occur in patients following whole bone marrow irradiation and that the technique is feasible. Whole bone marrow irradiation combined with chemotherapy represents a new conceptual therapeutic approach for multiple myeloma.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Cornell University Medical College, New York, NY
OSTI Identifier:
5441957
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cancer (Philadelphia); (United States); Journal Volume: 49:7
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BONE MARROW; NEOPLASMS; RADIOTHERAPY; ADULTS; ELDERLY PEOPLE; FEMALES; IRRADIATION; PATIENTS; AGE GROUPS; ANIMAL TISSUES; BODY; DISEASES; HEMATOPOIETIC SYSTEM; HUMAN POPULATIONS; MEDICINE; MINORITY GROUPS; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ORGANS; POPULATIONS; RADIOLOGY; THERAPY; TISSUES; 550603* - Medicine- External Radiation in Therapy- (1980-)

Citation Formats

Coleman, M., Saletan, S., Wolf, D., Nisce, L., Wasser, J., McIntyre, O.R., and Tulloh, M.. Whole bone marrow irradiation for the treatment of multiple myeloma. United States: N. p., 1982. Web. doi:10.1002/1097-0142(19820401)49:7<1328::AID-CNCR2820490703>3.0.CO;2-4.
Coleman, M., Saletan, S., Wolf, D., Nisce, L., Wasser, J., McIntyre, O.R., & Tulloh, M.. Whole bone marrow irradiation for the treatment of multiple myeloma. United States. doi:10.1002/1097-0142(19820401)49:7<1328::AID-CNCR2820490703>3.0.CO;2-4.
Coleman, M., Saletan, S., Wolf, D., Nisce, L., Wasser, J., McIntyre, O.R., and Tulloh, M.. Thu . "Whole bone marrow irradiation for the treatment of multiple myeloma". United States. doi:10.1002/1097-0142(19820401)49:7<1328::AID-CNCR2820490703>3.0.CO;2-4.
@article{osti_5441957,
title = {Whole bone marrow irradiation for the treatment of multiple myeloma},
author = {Coleman, M. and Saletan, S. and Wolf, D. and Nisce, L. and Wasser, J. and McIntyre, O.R. and Tulloh, M.},
abstractNote = {Nine patients with multiple myeloma were treated with whole bone marrow irradiation. Six had heavily pretreated disease refractory to chemotherapy. Three had stable disease lightly pretreated by chemotherapy. A modification of the ''three and two'' total nodal radiation technique was employed. Although varying and often severe treatment related cytopenia occurred, infectious complications, clinical bleeding, and nonhematalogic complications were minimal. Five of nine patients showed a decrease in monoclonal protein components, and one showed an increase during treatment. These preliminary results indicate that a reduction of tumor cell burden may occur in patients following whole bone marrow irradiation and that the technique is feasible. Whole bone marrow irradiation combined with chemotherapy represents a new conceptual therapeutic approach for multiple myeloma.},
doi = {10.1002/1097-0142(19820401)49:7<1328::AID-CNCR2820490703>3.0.CO;2-4},
journal = {Cancer (Philadelphia); (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 49:7,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 1982},
month = {Thu Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 1982}
}
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