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Title: Air pollution and asthma: clinical studies with sulfuric acid aerosols

Abstract

Until recently, acid deposition has been widely considered a serious ecological problem but not a threat to human health. The controlled clinical study is an important approach in linking acidic aerosol inhalation with respiratory effects. Asthmatic patients represent a subpopulation most responsive to sulfuric acid aerosols. In a series of studies with asthmatic volunteers, several factors have been identified that may modulate the intensity of the bronchoconstrictor response to inhaled acidic aerosols. We found (1) enhancement of the bronchoconstrictor response during exercise, (2) the more acidic aerosols provoke the greatest changes in lung function, and (3) mitigation of airway responses during sulfuric acid aerosol inhalation caused by high respiratory ammonia concentrations. Additional factors influencing responsiveness await identification.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. (University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, NY (United States))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5441052
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Allergy Proceedings; (United States); Journal Volume: 12:6
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; LUNGS; SENSITIVITY; SULFURIC ACID; TOXICITY; AEROSOLS; AIR POLLUTION; ASTHMA; EXERCISE; INHALATION; METABOLISM; VASOCONSTRICTION; BODY; COLLOIDS; DISEASES; DISPERSIONS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; INORGANIC ACIDS; INTAKE; ORGANS; POLLUTION; RESPIRATORY SYSTEM; RESPIRATORY SYSTEM DISEASES; SOLS; 560300* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology

Citation Formats

Utell, M.J., Frampton, M.W., and Morrow, P.E. Air pollution and asthma: clinical studies with sulfuric acid aerosols. United States: N. p., 1991. Web. doi:10.2500/108854191779114284.
Utell, M.J., Frampton, M.W., & Morrow, P.E. Air pollution and asthma: clinical studies with sulfuric acid aerosols. United States. doi:10.2500/108854191779114284.
Utell, M.J., Frampton, M.W., and Morrow, P.E. Fri . "Air pollution and asthma: clinical studies with sulfuric acid aerosols". United States. doi:10.2500/108854191779114284.
@article{osti_5441052,
title = {Air pollution and asthma: clinical studies with sulfuric acid aerosols},
author = {Utell, M.J. and Frampton, M.W. and Morrow, P.E.},
abstractNote = {Until recently, acid deposition has been widely considered a serious ecological problem but not a threat to human health. The controlled clinical study is an important approach in linking acidic aerosol inhalation with respiratory effects. Asthmatic patients represent a subpopulation most responsive to sulfuric acid aerosols. In a series of studies with asthmatic volunteers, several factors have been identified that may modulate the intensity of the bronchoconstrictor response to inhaled acidic aerosols. We found (1) enhancement of the bronchoconstrictor response during exercise, (2) the more acidic aerosols provoke the greatest changes in lung function, and (3) mitigation of airway responses during sulfuric acid aerosol inhalation caused by high respiratory ammonia concentrations. Additional factors influencing responsiveness await identification.},
doi = {10.2500/108854191779114284},
journal = {Allergy Proceedings; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 12:6,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 1991},
month = {Fri Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 1991}
}
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