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Title: A note on the change in gene frequency of a selected allele in partial full-sib mating populations

Abstract

The change in gene frequency of a selected allele in partial full-sib mating populations was analyzed. The implications of these papers is important in terms of the fixation probability of genes because, for the same equilibrium inbreeding coefficient, fixation rates of mutant genes would be larger for partial full-sib mating than for partial selfing. 4 refs.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
543054
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Genetics; Journal Volume: 142; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: PBD: Feb 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; 99 MATHEMATICS, COMPUTERS, INFORMATION SCIENCE, MANAGEMENT, LAW, MISCELLANEOUS; POPULATIONS; MATING; GENETICS; GENOTYPE; ANIMAL BREEDING; GENES; GENE MUTATIONS; MUTATION FREQUENCY; MATHEMATICAL MODELS

Citation Formats

Caballero, A. A note on the change in gene frequency of a selected allele in partial full-sib mating populations. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Caballero, A. A note on the change in gene frequency of a selected allele in partial full-sib mating populations. United States.
Caballero, A. 1996. "A note on the change in gene frequency of a selected allele in partial full-sib mating populations". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_543054,
title = {A note on the change in gene frequency of a selected allele in partial full-sib mating populations},
author = {Caballero, A.},
abstractNote = {The change in gene frequency of a selected allele in partial full-sib mating populations was analyzed. The implications of these papers is important in terms of the fixation probability of genes because, for the same equilibrium inbreeding coefficient, fixation rates of mutant genes would be larger for partial full-sib mating than for partial selfing. 4 refs.},
doi = {},
journal = {Genetics},
number = 2,
volume = 142,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month = 2
}
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