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Title: epsilon-N-trimethyllysine availability regulates the rate of carnitine biosynthesis in the growing rat

Abstract

Rates of carnitine biosynthesis in mammals depend on the availability of substrates and the activity of enzymes subserving the pathway. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that the availability of epsilon-N-trimethyllysine is rate-limiting for synthesis of carnitine in the growing rat and to evaluate diet as a source of this precursor for carnitine biosynthesis. Rats apparently absorbed greater than 90% of a tracer dose of (methyl-/sup 3/H)epsilon-N-trimethyllysine, and approximately 30% of that was incorporated into tissues as (/sup 3/H)carnitine. Rats given oral supplements of epsilon-N-trimethyllysine (0.5-20 mg/d), but no dietary carnitine, excreted more carnitine than control animals receiving no dietary epsilon-N-trimethyllysine or carnitine. Rates of carnitine excretion increased in a dose-dependent manner. Tissue and serum levels of carnitine also increased with dietary epsilon-N-trimethyllysine supplementation. There was no evidence that the capacity for carnitine biosynthesis was saturated even at the highest level of oral epsilon-N-trimethyllysine supplementation. Common dietary proteins (casein, soy protein and wheat gluten) were found to be poor sources of epsilon-N-trimethyllysine for carnitine biosynthesis. The results of this study indicate that the availability of epsilon-N-trimethyllysine limits the rate of carnitine biosynthesis in the growing rat.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City
OSTI Identifier:
5429984
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
J. Nutr.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; CARNITINE; BIOSYNTHESIS; EXCRETION; HYDROXYLASES; ENZYME ACTIVITY; LYSINE; BIOLOGICAL AVAILABILITY; BIOLOGICAL PATHWAYS; DIET; DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS; PRECURSOR; RATS; TISSUE DISTRIBUTION; TRACER TECHNIQUES; TRITIUM COMPOUNDS; AMINO ACIDS; ANIMALS; CARBOXYLIC ACIDS; CLEARANCE; DISTRIBUTION; ENZYMES; HYDROXY ACIDS; ISOTOPE APPLICATIONS; LABELLED COMPOUNDS; MAMMALS; ORGANIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OXIDOREDUCTASES; RODENTS; SYNTHESIS; VERTEBRATES; VITAMIN B GROUP; VITAMINS; 550201* - Biochemistry- Tracer Techniques

Citation Formats

Rebouche, C J, Lehman, L J, and Olson, L. epsilon-N-trimethyllysine availability regulates the rate of carnitine biosynthesis in the growing rat. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Rebouche, C J, Lehman, L J, & Olson, L. epsilon-N-trimethyllysine availability regulates the rate of carnitine biosynthesis in the growing rat. United States.
Rebouche, C J, Lehman, L J, and Olson, L. Thu . "epsilon-N-trimethyllysine availability regulates the rate of carnitine biosynthesis in the growing rat". United States.
@article{osti_5429984,
title = {epsilon-N-trimethyllysine availability regulates the rate of carnitine biosynthesis in the growing rat},
author = {Rebouche, C J and Lehman, L J and Olson, L},
abstractNote = {Rates of carnitine biosynthesis in mammals depend on the availability of substrates and the activity of enzymes subserving the pathway. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that the availability of epsilon-N-trimethyllysine is rate-limiting for synthesis of carnitine in the growing rat and to evaluate diet as a source of this precursor for carnitine biosynthesis. Rats apparently absorbed greater than 90% of a tracer dose of (methyl-/sup 3/H)epsilon-N-trimethyllysine, and approximately 30% of that was incorporated into tissues as (/sup 3/H)carnitine. Rats given oral supplements of epsilon-N-trimethyllysine (0.5-20 mg/d), but no dietary carnitine, excreted more carnitine than control animals receiving no dietary epsilon-N-trimethyllysine or carnitine. Rates of carnitine excretion increased in a dose-dependent manner. Tissue and serum levels of carnitine also increased with dietary epsilon-N-trimethyllysine supplementation. There was no evidence that the capacity for carnitine biosynthesis was saturated even at the highest level of oral epsilon-N-trimethyllysine supplementation. Common dietary proteins (casein, soy protein and wheat gluten) were found to be poor sources of epsilon-N-trimethyllysine for carnitine biosynthesis. The results of this study indicate that the availability of epsilon-N-trimethyllysine limits the rate of carnitine biosynthesis in the growing rat.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/5429984}, journal = {J. Nutr.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 5,
place = {United States},
year = {1986},
month = {5}
}