skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Short rotation woody crops for US energy production: The potential for reducing national carbon dioxide emissions

Abstract

There are three strategies for using trees to reduce carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) buildup in the atmosphere. First, new forest (or plantations) can be created and existing forest (or plantations) managed to remove CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere and store it as fixed carbon. Second, trees can be strategically planted in urban areas to provide shade and to cool the air thereby reducing energy consumption for air-conditioning and, consequently, fossil fuel emissions of CO{sub 2}. Third, wood can be used as an energy feedstock to displace fossil fuels. Because the carbon released to the atmosphere when biomass energy feedstock is used originated from the atmosphere, the net carbon emission from using biomass-derived energy is presumably low if the used biomass is constantly being replaced with an equal amount of new biomass. This last caveat is quite important, because using biomass for fuel without accompanying regrowth represents a significant net CO{sub 2} emission to the atmosphere. The first strategy, increasing the amount of carbon stored in trees or wood, is a midterm solution as limits exist on the area of land that could be dedicated to forests and on the carbon density (tons carbon stored per acre) of that forest. Themore » second and third strategies are long-term solutions because the annual carbon savings from reducing fossil fuel consumption can be maintained indefinitely. 1 ref., 3 tabs.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
5427358
Report Number(s):
CONF-9106271-1
ON: DE91017861
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-84OR21400
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement southern regional meeting, Charleston, SC (United States), 18-20 Jun 1991
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; MITIGATION; SILVICULTURE; PRODUCTIVITY; WOOD FUELS; RESOURCE ASSESSMENT; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; BIOCONVERSION; BIOMASS; CARBON CYCLE; CARBON DIOXIDE; COPPICES; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; FORESTRY; FORESTS; FOSSIL FUELS; LAND USE; RENEWABLE RESOURCES; AGRICULTURE; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CHALCOGENIDES; CONTROL; ENERGY SOURCES; FUELS; INDUSTRY; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION CONTROL; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; RESOURCES; 090700* - Biomass Fuels- Resources- (1990-); 095000 - Biomass Fuels- Environmental Aspects- (1990-); 540120 - Environment, Atmospheric- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Graham, R L. Short rotation woody crops for US energy production: The potential for reducing national carbon dioxide emissions. United States: N. p., 1991. Web.
Graham, R L. Short rotation woody crops for US energy production: The potential for reducing national carbon dioxide emissions. United States.
Graham, R L. Tue . "Short rotation woody crops for US energy production: The potential for reducing national carbon dioxide emissions". United States.
@article{osti_5427358,
title = {Short rotation woody crops for US energy production: The potential for reducing national carbon dioxide emissions},
author = {Graham, R L},
abstractNote = {There are three strategies for using trees to reduce carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) buildup in the atmosphere. First, new forest (or plantations) can be created and existing forest (or plantations) managed to remove CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere and store it as fixed carbon. Second, trees can be strategically planted in urban areas to provide shade and to cool the air thereby reducing energy consumption for air-conditioning and, consequently, fossil fuel emissions of CO{sub 2}. Third, wood can be used as an energy feedstock to displace fossil fuels. Because the carbon released to the atmosphere when biomass energy feedstock is used originated from the atmosphere, the net carbon emission from using biomass-derived energy is presumably low if the used biomass is constantly being replaced with an equal amount of new biomass. This last caveat is quite important, because using biomass for fuel without accompanying regrowth represents a significant net CO{sub 2} emission to the atmosphere. The first strategy, increasing the amount of carbon stored in trees or wood, is a midterm solution as limits exist on the area of land that could be dedicated to forests and on the carbon density (tons carbon stored per acre) of that forest. The second and third strategies are long-term solutions because the annual carbon savings from reducing fossil fuel consumption can be maintained indefinitely. 1 ref., 3 tabs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1991},
month = {1}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: