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Title: Thermal modeling of residential attics with radiant barriers: Comparison with laboratory and field data

Abstract

Radiant barriers (RBs) are receiving increasing attention as an energy conservation measure. A number of experiments that have been performed by several organizations have demonstrated the energy savings potential for RBs. The experiments have utilized a number of different attic and RB configurations and have been conducted under differing weather conditions. Because of this, it is difficult to intercompare the experimental results. Models are needed to gain a better understanding of the performance of radiant barriers, to extrapolate experimental data to seasonal and annual performances, and to estimate the performance under other climatic conditions. This paper describes models that have been developed at ORNL for residential attics, with or without radiant barriers. Models based on systems of heat balances have been developed for both horizontal RBs that are laid on top of the attic insulation, and for radiant barriers attached to the bottom of the top chords of attic trusses. The models include features such as radiation interchanges within the space, convection to ventilation air, and sorption/desorption of moisture at surfaces facing the attic space. The paper gives comparisons of model predictions with data from steady-state laboratory experiments and from field experiments with full-size houses. 19 refs., 8 figs., 5more » tabs.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE/CE
OSTI Identifier:
5425385
Report Number(s):
CONF-891202-2
ON: DE89016287
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-84OR21400
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 4. thermal performance of the exterior envelopes of buildings, Orlando, FL (USA), 4-7 Dec 1989
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; ATTICS; RADIANT HEAT TRANSFER; CLIMATES; ENERGY CONSERVATION; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; HOUSES; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS; THERMAL BARRIERS; BUILDINGS; DATA; EFFICIENCY; ENERGY TRANSFER; HEAT TRANSFER; INFORMATION; NUMERICAL DATA; 320107* - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Building Systems- (1987-)

Citation Formats

Wilkes, K E. Thermal modeling of residential attics with radiant barriers: Comparison with laboratory and field data. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Wilkes, K E. Thermal modeling of residential attics with radiant barriers: Comparison with laboratory and field data. United States.
Wilkes, K E. Sun . "Thermal modeling of residential attics with radiant barriers: Comparison with laboratory and field data". United States.
@article{osti_5425385,
title = {Thermal modeling of residential attics with radiant barriers: Comparison with laboratory and field data},
author = {Wilkes, K E},
abstractNote = {Radiant barriers (RBs) are receiving increasing attention as an energy conservation measure. A number of experiments that have been performed by several organizations have demonstrated the energy savings potential for RBs. The experiments have utilized a number of different attic and RB configurations and have been conducted under differing weather conditions. Because of this, it is difficult to intercompare the experimental results. Models are needed to gain a better understanding of the performance of radiant barriers, to extrapolate experimental data to seasonal and annual performances, and to estimate the performance under other climatic conditions. This paper describes models that have been developed at ORNL for residential attics, with or without radiant barriers. Models based on systems of heat balances have been developed for both horizontal RBs that are laid on top of the attic insulation, and for radiant barriers attached to the bottom of the top chords of attic trusses. The models include features such as radiation interchanges within the space, convection to ventilation air, and sorption/desorption of moisture at surfaces facing the attic space. The paper gives comparisons of model predictions with data from steady-state laboratory experiments and from field experiments with full-size houses. 19 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1989},
month = {1}
}

Conference:
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