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Title: Advanced radiator concepts feasibility demonstration. [Li; Na; K]

Abstract

An innovative pumped loop concept for 600 K space power system radiators is under development utilizing direct contact heat transfer, which facilitates repeated startup/shutdown of the power system without complex and time-consuming coolant thawing during power startup. The melting/freezing process of Li in a NaK flow was studied experimentally to demonstrate the Li/NaK radiator feasibility during startup (thawing) and shutdown (cold-trapping). Results of the vapor grown carbon fiber/composite thermal conductivity measurements are also presented.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. (Space Power, Incorporated, 621 River Oaks Parkway, San Jose, CA (USA))
  2. (NASA Lewis Research Center, 21000 Brookpark Road, Cleveland, OH (USA))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5418158
Report Number(s):
CONF-910116-
Journal ID: ISSN 0094-243X; CODEN: APCPC
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings (American Institute of Physics); (United States); Journal Volume: 217:2; Conference: 8. symposium on space nuclear power systems, Albuquerque, NM (United States), 6-10 Jan 1991
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; RADIATORS; DESIGN; SPACE POWER REACTORS; COLD TRAPS; COOLANT LOOPS; HEAT TRANSFER; LIQUID METALS; LITHIUM; POTASSIUM; REACTOR COOLING SYSTEMS; SODIUM; THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY; ALKALI METALS; CONDENSERS; COOLING SYSTEMS; ELEMENTS; ENERGY SYSTEMS; ENERGY TRANSFER; FLUIDS; HEAT EXCHANGERS; LIQUIDS; METALS; MOBILE REACTORS; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; POWER REACTORS; REACTOR COMPONENTS; REACTORS; THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES; TRAPS; VAPOR CONDENSERS; NESDPS Office of Nuclear Energy Space and Defense Power Systems; 220800* - Nuclear Reactor Technology- Propulsion Reactors; 220200 - Nuclear Reactor Technology- Components & Accessories

Citation Formats

Rhee, H.S., Begg, L., Wetch, J.R., and Juhasz, A.J. Advanced radiator concepts feasibility demonstration. [Li; Na; K]. United States: N. p., 1991. Web. doi:10.1063/1.40129.
Rhee, H.S., Begg, L., Wetch, J.R., & Juhasz, A.J. Advanced radiator concepts feasibility demonstration. [Li; Na; K]. United States. doi:10.1063/1.40129.
Rhee, H.S., Begg, L., Wetch, J.R., and Juhasz, A.J. 1991. "Advanced radiator concepts feasibility demonstration. [Li; Na; K]". United States. doi:10.1063/1.40129.
@article{osti_5418158,
title = {Advanced radiator concepts feasibility demonstration. [Li; Na; K]},
author = {Rhee, H.S. and Begg, L. and Wetch, J.R. and Juhasz, A.J.},
abstractNote = {An innovative pumped loop concept for 600 K space power system radiators is under development utilizing direct contact heat transfer, which facilitates repeated startup/shutdown of the power system without complex and time-consuming coolant thawing during power startup. The melting/freezing process of Li in a NaK flow was studied experimentally to demonstrate the Li/NaK radiator feasibility during startup (thawing) and shutdown (cold-trapping). Results of the vapor grown carbon fiber/composite thermal conductivity measurements are also presented.},
doi = {10.1063/1.40129},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings (American Institute of Physics); (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 217:2,
place = {United States},
year = 1991,
month = 1
}

Conference:
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