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Title: Radiation sensitivity of Merkel cell carcinoma cell lines

Abstract

Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), being a small cell carcinoma, would be expected to be sensitive to radiation. Clinical analysis of patients at our center, especially those with macroscopic disease, would suggest the response is quite variable. We have recently established a number of MCC cell lines from patients prior to radiotherapy, and for the first time are in a position to determine their sensitivity under controlled conditions. Some of the MCC lines grew as suspension cultures and could not be single cell cloned; therefore, it was not possible to use clonogenic survival for all cell lines. A tetrazolium based (MTT) assay was used for these lines, to estimate cell growth after {gamma} irradiation. Control experiments were conducted on lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) and the adherent MCC line, MCC13, to demonstrate that the two assays were comparable under the conditions used. We have examined cell lines from MCC, small cell lung cancer (SCLC), malignant melanomas, Epstein Barr virus (EBV) transformed lymphocytes (LCL), and skin fibroblasts for their sensitivity to {gamma} irradiation using both clonogenic cell survival and MTT assays. The results show that the tumor cell lines have a range of sensitivities, with melanoma being more resistant (surviving fraction at 2more » Gy (SF2) 0.57 and 0.56) than the small cell carcinoma lines, MCC (SF2 range 0.21-0.45, mean SF2 0.30, n = 8) and SCLC (SF2 0.31). Fibroblasts were the most sensitive (SF2 0.13-0.20, mean 0.16, n = 5). The MTT assay, when compared to clonogenic assay for the MCC13 adherent line and the LCL, gave comparable results under the conditions used. Both assays gave a range of SF2 values for the MCC cell lines, suggesting that these cancers would give a heterogeneous response in vivo. The results with the two derivative clones of MCC14 (SF2 for MCC14/1 0.38, MCC14/2 0.45) would further suggest that some of them may develop resistance during clonogenic evolution. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Queensland Institute of Medical Research (Australia) [and others
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
539413
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 32; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: PBD: 30 Jul 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; 55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; PATIENTS; CARCINOMAS; RADIOTHERAPY; MELANOMAS; SURVIVAL CURVES; FIBROBLASTS; RADIOSENSITIVITY; CLONING; GROWTH; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; LYMPHOCYTES; SKIN; BIOLOGICAL MARKERS; CESIUM 137; TETRAZOLIUM; BIOASSAY; GAMMA RADIATION

Citation Formats

Leonard, J.H., Ramsay, J.R., and Birrell, G.W.. Radiation sensitivity of Merkel cell carcinoma cell lines. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.1016/0360-3016(94)00610-W.
Leonard, J.H., Ramsay, J.R., & Birrell, G.W.. Radiation sensitivity of Merkel cell carcinoma cell lines. United States. doi:10.1016/0360-3016(94)00610-W.
Leonard, J.H., Ramsay, J.R., and Birrell, G.W.. Sun . "Radiation sensitivity of Merkel cell carcinoma cell lines". United States. doi:10.1016/0360-3016(94)00610-W.
@article{osti_539413,
title = {Radiation sensitivity of Merkel cell carcinoma cell lines},
author = {Leonard, J.H. and Ramsay, J.R. and Birrell, G.W.},
abstractNote = {Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), being a small cell carcinoma, would be expected to be sensitive to radiation. Clinical analysis of patients at our center, especially those with macroscopic disease, would suggest the response is quite variable. We have recently established a number of MCC cell lines from patients prior to radiotherapy, and for the first time are in a position to determine their sensitivity under controlled conditions. Some of the MCC lines grew as suspension cultures and could not be single cell cloned; therefore, it was not possible to use clonogenic survival for all cell lines. A tetrazolium based (MTT) assay was used for these lines, to estimate cell growth after {gamma} irradiation. Control experiments were conducted on lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) and the adherent MCC line, MCC13, to demonstrate that the two assays were comparable under the conditions used. We have examined cell lines from MCC, small cell lung cancer (SCLC), malignant melanomas, Epstein Barr virus (EBV) transformed lymphocytes (LCL), and skin fibroblasts for their sensitivity to {gamma} irradiation using both clonogenic cell survival and MTT assays. The results show that the tumor cell lines have a range of sensitivities, with melanoma being more resistant (surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) 0.57 and 0.56) than the small cell carcinoma lines, MCC (SF2 range 0.21-0.45, mean SF2 0.30, n = 8) and SCLC (SF2 0.31). Fibroblasts were the most sensitive (SF2 0.13-0.20, mean 0.16, n = 5). The MTT assay, when compared to clonogenic assay for the MCC13 adherent line and the LCL, gave comparable results under the conditions used. Both assays gave a range of SF2 values for the MCC cell lines, suggesting that these cancers would give a heterogeneous response in vivo. The results with the two derivative clones of MCC14 (SF2 for MCC14/1 0.38, MCC14/2 0.45) would further suggest that some of them may develop resistance during clonogenic evolution. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.},
doi = {10.1016/0360-3016(94)00610-W},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 5,
volume = 32,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jul 30 00:00:00 EDT 1995},
month = {Sun Jul 30 00:00:00 EDT 1995}
}