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Title: Seismic fracture anisotropy in the Earth's crust: An overview

Abstract

Fluid-filled fractures and microcracks are the most stress sensitive component of crustal rock and often determine the pathways and volume of crustal fluid movement. If we are to comprehend the role of fractures and fluids in tectonic processes, to formulate an accurate hypothesis for phenomena precursory to catastrophic seismic failure, or to monitor hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs for the presence or absence of major fluid pathways, we must understand how seismic waves interact with the fracture, crack, and microcrack structures within the rock mass. A salient feature of fracture-related rock structure is the effective seismic anisotropy of aligned fractures and microcracks. With the advent of large-volume digital seismic data sets it is feasible to use polarized shear waves to explore the anisotropic fracture properties of the crust. Crustal fracture structures which may be monitored by polarized shear waves range in dimensions from the 10-100 km scale of crustal stress orientation and preseismic stress buildup, through the 100-1,000 m scale of fluid reservoir structure and characterization, and the 1-10 scale of mining and geoengineering rock strain monitoring, to millimeter and micrometer or possibly smaller fluid-filled inclusions determining the elastic response of the intact rock mass.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (USA)
  2. British Geological Survey, Edinburgh (England)
  3. Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5387187
Report Number(s):
CONF-880531-
Journal ID: ISSN 0148-0227; CODEN: JGREA
Resource Type:
Conference
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 95:B7; Conference: 3. international workshop on seismic anisotropy, Berkeley, CA (United States), 31 May - 4 Jun 1988; Journal ID: ISSN 0148-0227
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; CONTINENTAL CRUST; STRESS ANALYSIS; GEOLOGIC FRACTURES; ANISOTROPY; FRACTURE MECHANICS; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; GEOLOGIC STRUCTURES; GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES; HYDROCARBONS; ORIENTATION; RESERVOIR FLUIDS; ROCK MECHANICS; SEISMIC DETECTION; SEISMIC S WAVES; SEISMIC SURVEYS; TECTONICS; DETECTION; EARTH CRUST; FLUIDS; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; MECHANICS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; RESOURCES; SEISMIC WAVES; SURVEYS; 580000* - Geosciences

Citation Formats

Leary, P C, Crampin, S, and McEvilly, T V. Seismic fracture anisotropy in the Earth's crust: An overview. United States: N. p., 1990. Web.
Leary, P C, Crampin, S, & McEvilly, T V. Seismic fracture anisotropy in the Earth's crust: An overview. United States.
Leary, P C, Crampin, S, and McEvilly, T V. Tue . "Seismic fracture anisotropy in the Earth's crust: An overview". United States.
@article{osti_5387187,
title = {Seismic fracture anisotropy in the Earth's crust: An overview},
author = {Leary, P C and Crampin, S and McEvilly, T V},
abstractNote = {Fluid-filled fractures and microcracks are the most stress sensitive component of crustal rock and often determine the pathways and volume of crustal fluid movement. If we are to comprehend the role of fractures and fluids in tectonic processes, to formulate an accurate hypothesis for phenomena precursory to catastrophic seismic failure, or to monitor hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs for the presence or absence of major fluid pathways, we must understand how seismic waves interact with the fracture, crack, and microcrack structures within the rock mass. A salient feature of fracture-related rock structure is the effective seismic anisotropy of aligned fractures and microcracks. With the advent of large-volume digital seismic data sets it is feasible to use polarized shear waves to explore the anisotropic fracture properties of the crust. Crustal fracture structures which may be monitored by polarized shear waves range in dimensions from the 10-100 km scale of crustal stress orientation and preseismic stress buildup, through the 100-1,000 m scale of fluid reservoir structure and characterization, and the 1-10 scale of mining and geoengineering rock strain monitoring, to millimeter and micrometer or possibly smaller fluid-filled inclusions determining the elastic response of the intact rock mass.},
doi = {},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research; (United States)},
issn = {0148-0227},
number = ,
volume = 95:B7,
place = {United States},
year = {1990},
month = {7}
}

Conference:
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