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Title: Optimum cylinder cooling for advanced diesel engines

Abstract

Continuous demand for higher specific engine output simultaneously introduces problems of higher mechanical and thermal stresses of the engine components. Uneven temperature distribution in the cylinder wall of a Diesel engine, especially when air-cooled, is well known. Peak local temperatures, large circumferential and longitudinal temperature gradients provoke deformations that in turn affect the reliability of the engine. As the result of intensive numerical and experimental investigations a horizontal, curved channel fed with engine lubrication oil was introduced in the upper part of the air-cooled cylinder. Optimization of the channel design, its position, and determination of suitable asymmetrical split oil-flow have led to more favorable cylinder temperature distribution, similar to that obtained by advanced water-cooled engines. Analyses of the local laminar oil-flow phenomena and local heat transfer distribution in curved channels can be successfully and effectively applied to advanced liquid-cooled engines.

Authors:
;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Univ. of Ljubljana (Slovenia). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
  2. Univ. of Maribor (Slovenia). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
538103
Report Number(s):
CONF-9610275-
ISBN 0-7918-1516-1; TRN: IM9746%%28
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 18. annual fall technical conference of the ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division, Fairborn, OH (United States), 20-23 Oct 1996; Other Information: PBD: 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of Advanced designs and operations: Volume 1. Proceedings of the 18. annual fall technical conference of the ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division; ICE-Volume 27-1; Caton, J.A. [ed.] [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)]; PB: 116 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; DIESEL ENGINES; COOLING SYSTEMS; THERMAL STRESSES; RELIABILITY; LUBRICATING OILS; TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION

Citation Formats

Trenc, F., Rodman, S., Skerget, L., and Delic, M. Optimum cylinder cooling for advanced diesel engines. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Trenc, F., Rodman, S., Skerget, L., & Delic, M. Optimum cylinder cooling for advanced diesel engines. United States.
Trenc, F., Rodman, S., Skerget, L., and Delic, M. 1996. "Optimum cylinder cooling for advanced diesel engines". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_538103,
title = {Optimum cylinder cooling for advanced diesel engines},
author = {Trenc, F. and Rodman, S. and Skerget, L. and Delic, M.},
abstractNote = {Continuous demand for higher specific engine output simultaneously introduces problems of higher mechanical and thermal stresses of the engine components. Uneven temperature distribution in the cylinder wall of a Diesel engine, especially when air-cooled, is well known. Peak local temperatures, large circumferential and longitudinal temperature gradients provoke deformations that in turn affect the reliability of the engine. As the result of intensive numerical and experimental investigations a horizontal, curved channel fed with engine lubrication oil was introduced in the upper part of the air-cooled cylinder. Optimization of the channel design, its position, and determination of suitable asymmetrical split oil-flow have led to more favorable cylinder temperature distribution, similar to that obtained by advanced water-cooled engines. Analyses of the local laminar oil-flow phenomena and local heat transfer distribution in curved channels can be successfully and effectively applied to advanced liquid-cooled engines.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month =
}

Conference:
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  • Continuous demand for higher specific engine output simultaneously introduces problems of higher mechanical and thermal stresses of the engine components. Uneven temperature distribution in the cylinder wall of a diesel engine, especially when air-cooled, is well known. Peak local temperatures, large circumferential and longitudinal temperature gradients provoke deformations that, in turn, affect the reliability of the engine. As the result of intensive numerical and experimental investigations, a horizontal, curved channel fed with engine lubrication oil was introduced in the upper part of the air-cooled cylinder. Optimization of the channel design, its position, and determination of suitable asymmetrical split oil flowmore » have led to more favorable cylinder temperature distribution, similar to that obtained by advanced water-cooled engines. Analyses of the local laminar oil-flow phenomena and local heat transfer distribution is curved channels are discussed in the paper and can be successfully applied to advanced liquid-cooled engines.« less
  • Two computer models were used for simulation of the local flow, wall temperature, and heat transfer in combustion chambers of diesel engines. A multidimensional model linked with the conventional {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model was employed for the calculation of in-cylinder phenomena. A finite difference procedure with an expanding/contracting grid in axisymmetric and curvilinear representation was used. Fuel injection, accommodated by an empirical formula of spray, was modeled in the form of gaseous jet. Combustion was treated using experimental data of the heat release rate. The temperature distributions of the walls were calculated by another model of thermal analysis, a finite elementmore » method, for the cylinder head, cylinder, comet chamber, and piston. Both models were coupled with boundary conditions, namely, wall functions. In DI engine, the flow and temperature fields of cylinder and piston cavity were calculated. In IDI engine, only the comet chamber was considered for the flow and temperature computations. These calculations were utilized to estimate heat transfer performance of combustion chambers and to investigate the thermal effects of hardware design.« less
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  • High temperature tribology research efforts being pursued at Adiabatics are directed in the area of post treatment densified plasma sprayed coatings. Previous work has yielded good results for laboratory bench tests using no liquid lubrication. The process infiltrates a thermal sprayed coating layer with Chrome Oxide and Phosphate Glass compounds which serve to enhance the mechanical bond of a thermal sprayed layer, while improving its internal integrity, and sealing off open porosity. It has been applied to over 150 different wear combinations. Of these tests, Iron Oxide based coatings versus Molybdenum alloy materials provide the best results. Testing in amore » modified Low Heat Rejection (LHR) single cylinder diesel engine proved this wear combination superior to the state of the art materials available today. These data show improvement over past research efforts directed at developing solid lubricants, but they do not achieve goals set for operation in future advanced military LHR diesel powerplants. Through involvement with the support of the US Army Tank Automotive Research Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) the authors have predetermined a goal of attaining bench test friction coefficients of {mu}{sub f} < 0.10, and material wear rates {le}1.0 mg/hr, at a temperature of 540 C. The research efforts discussed in this paper, focus on optimizing material friction and wear combinations and their interaction with liquid lubricants to generate boundary lubrication effects noted in previous studies and their correlation to advanced diesel engine design.« less