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Title: The conversion of biomass to ethanol using geothermal energy derived from hot dry rock to supply both the thermal and electrical power requirements

Abstract

The potential synergism between a hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy source and the power requirements for the conversion of biomass to fuel ethanol is considerable. In addition, combining these two renewable energy resources to produce transportation fuel has very positive environmental implications. One of the distinct advantages of wedding an HDR geothermal power source to a biomass conversion process is flexibility, both in plant location and in operating process is flexibility, both in plant location and in operating conditions. The latter obtains since an HDR system is an injection conditions of flow rate, pressure, temperature, and water chemistry are under the control of the operator. The former obtains since, unlike a naturally occurring geothermal resource, the HDR resource is very widespread, particularly in the western US, and can be developed near transportation and plentiful supplies of biomass. Conceptually, the pressurized geofluid from the HDR reservoir would be produced at a temperature in the range of 200{degrees} to 220{degrees}c. The higher enthalpy portion of the geofluid thermal energy would be used to produce a lower-temperature steam supply in a countercurrent feedwater-heater/boiler. The steam, following a superheating stage fueled by the noncellulosic waste fraction of the biomass, would be expanded throughmore » a turbine to produce electrical power. Depending on the lignin fraction of the biomass, there would probably be excess electrical power generated over and above plant requirements (for slurry pumping, stirring, solids separation, etc.) which would be available for sale to the local power grid. In fact, if the hybrid HDR/biomass system were creatively configured, the power plant could be designed to produce daytime peaking power as well as a lower level of baseload power during off-peak hours.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Assistant Secretary for Human Resources and Administration, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
538043
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-97-2077; CONF-970701-
ON: DE98000265; TRN: 97:005464
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 32. intersociety energy conversion engineering conference, Honolulu, HI (United States), 27 Jul - 2 Aug 1997; Other Information: PBD: 1997
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; 09 BIOMASS FUELS; 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; LANL; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; HOT-DRY-ROCK SYSTEMS; RESOURCE POTENTIAL; ETHANOL; PRODUCTION; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES; GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; BIOMASS; Geothermal Legacy

Citation Formats

Brown, D.W. The conversion of biomass to ethanol using geothermal energy derived from hot dry rock to supply both the thermal and electrical power requirements. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Brown, D.W. The conversion of biomass to ethanol using geothermal energy derived from hot dry rock to supply both the thermal and electrical power requirements. United States.
Brown, D.W. 1997. "The conversion of biomass to ethanol using geothermal energy derived from hot dry rock to supply both the thermal and electrical power requirements". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/538043.
@article{osti_538043,
title = {The conversion of biomass to ethanol using geothermal energy derived from hot dry rock to supply both the thermal and electrical power requirements},
author = {Brown, D.W.},
abstractNote = {The potential synergism between a hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy source and the power requirements for the conversion of biomass to fuel ethanol is considerable. In addition, combining these two renewable energy resources to produce transportation fuel has very positive environmental implications. One of the distinct advantages of wedding an HDR geothermal power source to a biomass conversion process is flexibility, both in plant location and in operating process is flexibility, both in plant location and in operating conditions. The latter obtains since an HDR system is an injection conditions of flow rate, pressure, temperature, and water chemistry are under the control of the operator. The former obtains since, unlike a naturally occurring geothermal resource, the HDR resource is very widespread, particularly in the western US, and can be developed near transportation and plentiful supplies of biomass. Conceptually, the pressurized geofluid from the HDR reservoir would be produced at a temperature in the range of 200{degrees} to 220{degrees}c. The higher enthalpy portion of the geofluid thermal energy would be used to produce a lower-temperature steam supply in a countercurrent feedwater-heater/boiler. The steam, following a superheating stage fueled by the noncellulosic waste fraction of the biomass, would be expanded through a turbine to produce electrical power. Depending on the lignin fraction of the biomass, there would probably be excess electrical power generated over and above plant requirements (for slurry pumping, stirring, solids separation, etc.) which would be available for sale to the local power grid. In fact, if the hybrid HDR/biomass system were creatively configured, the power plant could be designed to produce daytime peaking power as well as a lower level of baseload power during off-peak hours.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1997,
month =
}

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  • The proprietary MOP (Multiple Oxygenates Production) Process, covered by US Patent {number_sign}5,070,016 which was granted in December 1991, offers an unique approach to the production of ethanol, methanol and their t-butyl ethers within the same operating facility. The MOP Process uses fully commercialized process operations to convert grain (or other biomass) and butanes to ethanol, methanol and their ether derivatives in a fully integrated complex, either as a standalone, grass roots project or integrated with an existing ethanol fermentation facility, petroleum refinery or petrochemical complex. Key to the MOP Process is the production of non hydrocarbon-derived methanol from carbon dioxidemore » that is normally vented from the ethanol fermentation process plus by-product hydrogen from the butane dehydrogenation process (or other external source). In most cases, the methanol is produced entirely from the offgas streams rather than from natural gas, the preferred raw material for the production of most conventional methanol. The integrated MOP Process is highly flexible, especially in terms of its finished product slate, and offers significant cost advantages for the production of MtBE and EtBE from the basic grain and butane raw materials, compared to conventional ether production methods which typically rely on purchased alcohol raw materials. Overall cost advantages for the production of methanol from biomass-derived carbon dioxide and by-product hydrogen are 42--48 cents/USgal, or 14--16 cents/USgal of MtBE equivalent.« less
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  • Combining direct and thermal power conversion results in a 52% gross plant efficiency with DT fuel and 68% with advanced DD fuel. The authors maximize the fraction of fusion-yield energy converted to kinetic energy in a liquid-lithium blanket, and use this energy directly with turbine generators to produce electricity. They use the remainder of the energy to produce electricity in a standard Rankine thermal power conversion cycle.
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