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Title: Labor and nuclear power

Abstract

The AFL-CIO is officially pro-nuclear, but tensions within unions are taking issue over ideological differences. The Labor movement, having looked to nuclear power development as an economic necessity to avoid unemployment, has opposed efforts to delay construction or close plants. As many as 42% of union members or relatives of members, however, were found to oppose new power plants, some actively working against specific construction projects. The United Mine Workers and Teamsters actively challenged the nuclear industry while the auto workers have been ambivalent. The differences between union orientation reflects the history of unionism in the US and explains the emergence of social unionism with its emphasis on safety and working conditions as well as economic benefits. Business union orientation trends to prevail during periods of prosperity; social unions during recessions. The labor unions and the environmentalists are examined in this conext and found to be hopeful. 35 references. (DCK)

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5378208
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environment; (United States); Journal Volume: 22:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; LABOR; NUCLEAR POWER; LABOR RELATIONS; ECONOMICS; EMPLOYMENT; PERSONNEL; PUBLIC OPINION; SAFETY; WORKING CONDITIONS; POWER; 290200* - Energy Planning & Policy- Economics & Sociology; 290600 - Energy Planning & Policy- Nuclear Energy; 530100 - Environmental-Social Aspects of Energy Technologies- Social & Economic Studies- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Logan, R., and Nelkin, D. Labor and nuclear power. United States: N. p., 1980. Web. doi:10.1080/00139157.1980.9929741.
Logan, R., & Nelkin, D. Labor and nuclear power. United States. doi:10.1080/00139157.1980.9929741.
Logan, R., and Nelkin, D. Sat . "Labor and nuclear power". United States. doi:10.1080/00139157.1980.9929741.
@article{osti_5378208,
title = {Labor and nuclear power},
author = {Logan, R. and Nelkin, D.},
abstractNote = {The AFL-CIO is officially pro-nuclear, but tensions within unions are taking issue over ideological differences. The Labor movement, having looked to nuclear power development as an economic necessity to avoid unemployment, has opposed efforts to delay construction or close plants. As many as 42% of union members or relatives of members, however, were found to oppose new power plants, some actively working against specific construction projects. The United Mine Workers and Teamsters actively challenged the nuclear industry while the auto workers have been ambivalent. The differences between union orientation reflects the history of unionism in the US and explains the emergence of social unionism with its emphasis on safety and working conditions as well as economic benefits. Business union orientation trends to prevail during periods of prosperity; social unions during recessions. The labor unions and the environmentalists are examined in this conext and found to be hopeful. 35 references. (DCK)},
doi = {10.1080/00139157.1980.9929741},
journal = {Environment; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 22:2,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1980},
month = {Sat Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1980}
}
  • An attempt is made to explain the impact of increasing governmental regulation on capital costs and labor requirements for constructing light water reactor (LWR) electric power plants. The principal factors contributing to these increases are: (1) market conditions and (2) increased regulation. General market conditions include additional costs attributable to price inflation of equipment, material, labor, and the increased cost of money. The central objective of this work is to estimate the impact of increasing regulation on plant costs and, conversely, on output. To do this it is necessary to isolate two opposing sets of forces which have been inmore » operation during the period of major regulatory expansion: learning based upon plant design experience and economies of scale with increasing size (generating capacity) of newer plants. Conceptual models are specified to capture the independent effects of increasing regulation, learning, and economies of scale. Empirical results were obtained by estimating the models on data collected from industry experience during the 1967-1980 period. 23 refs.« less
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