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Title: Electric-field-vector measurement in a glow discharge

Abstract

The magnetic quantum number selection rule implies that radiation that is linearly polarized perpendicular to the electric field will not excite ..delta..m = 0 transitions. This phenomenon in Stark spectra has been used to determine the electric field vector in a positive column dc discharge in helium. The technique is applicable to both linear and nonlinear Stark effects.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433
OSTI Identifier:
5373080
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Phys. Rev. A; (United States); Journal Volume: 32:4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; GLOW DISCHARGES; ELECTRIC FIELDS; HELIUM; STARK EFFECT; LINE BROADENING; POLARIZATION; RYDBERG STATES; SELECTION RULES; ELECTRIC DISCHARGES; ELEMENTS; ENERGY LEVELS; EXCITED STATES; FLUIDS; GASES; NONMETALS; RARE GASES; 640302* - Atomic, Molecular & Chemical Physics- Atomic & Molecular Properties & Theory

Citation Formats

Ganguly, B.N., and Garscadden, A.. Electric-field-vector measurement in a glow discharge. United States: N. p., 1985. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.32.2544.
Ganguly, B.N., & Garscadden, A.. Electric-field-vector measurement in a glow discharge. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.32.2544.
Ganguly, B.N., and Garscadden, A.. 1985. "Electric-field-vector measurement in a glow discharge". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.32.2544.
@article{osti_5373080,
title = {Electric-field-vector measurement in a glow discharge},
author = {Ganguly, B.N. and Garscadden, A.},
abstractNote = {The magnetic quantum number selection rule implies that radiation that is linearly polarized perpendicular to the electric field will not excite ..delta..m = 0 transitions. This phenomenon in Stark spectra has been used to determine the electric field vector in a positive column dc discharge in helium. The technique is applicable to both linear and nonlinear Stark effects.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevA.32.2544},
journal = {Phys. Rev. A; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 32:4,
place = {United States},
year = 1985,
month =
}
  • Spatial distribution of electric field strength in the cathode fall region of an analytical glow discharge in helium and helium-hydrogen mixture is determined from the Stark splitting and shifting of three visible helium lines and their forbidden components. For this diagnostic technique the basic theory is outlined. The results in gas mixture agree well with electric fields determined from the shape of H{sub {beta}} line. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}
  • Interest in glow discharge plasmas has remained high for many decades because of their widespread application as a source of incoherent and coherent light, in plasma processing materials, in pulsed power devices, and in other technologies. Plasma etching of semiconductors and various plasma deposition process emerged as major applications during the 1980s. The technological significance of plasma processing is described in Plasma Processing of Materials. More fundamental work on glow discharges also advanced greatly during the 1980s. For example, substantial progress was made through the use of laser diagnostics to study glow discharges and as a result of the dramaticallymore » increased computing power that became available in the 1980s to model glow discharges. Many of the laser diagnostics are described in Radiative Processes in Discharge Plasmas. Kinetic theory models, in particular, became far more sophisticated and realistic during the 1980s. This article is a review of recent work that used optical diagnostics to study electric fields in glow discharge plasmas. Alternative methods for measuring electric electric fields in plasmas include electron beam deflection and electrostatic probes. Optical techniques have important advantages over these methods: They can be used at higher pressures and discharge current densities than electron beam deflection; and they are noninvasive, unlike electrostatic probes. In addition, optical techniques are usually easier to apply in a highly pure system than either of the alternative methods. 46 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab.« less