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Title: Economic development and the allocation of petroleum products in Sudan

Abstract

The Sudanese economy has been characterized in recent years by severe energy shortages which have affected all economic activity. More than 94% of the commercial energy is imported and the level of such imports is seriously limited by the current foreign exchange crisis. However, the problem is not just one of foreign exchange; there is also the problem of utilization of resources to avoid bottleneck problems of supply. The allocation of petroleum products in Sudan has had a severe effect on all aspects of economic life. The aim of this paper is to highlight the problem and to build a model to optimize the distribution of petroleum products in order to achieve at least a minimal supply in all regions. A large linear programming model has been developed and the solution indicates that current facilities should be able to satisfy 96% of the 1986 demand, about 30% more than the actual supply. Furthermore, with a little investment in storage facilities and extra trucks, the supply could satisfy total demand in the immediate future.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. (U.C.W., Aberystwyth (United Kingdom))
  2. (General Petroleum Corp., Khartoum (Sudan))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5342313
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Materials and Society; (United States); Journal Volume: 15:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; ALLOCATIONS; SUDAN; ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT; AGRICULTURE; AVIATION FUELS; COMMERCIAL SECTOR; DIESEL FUELS; ENERGY DEMAND; ENERGY SHORTAGES; ENERGY SUPPLIES; FUEL OILS; GASOLINE; IMPORTS; INDUSTRIAL PLANTS; KEROSENE; LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GASES; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; OPTIMIZATION; STORAGE FACILITIES; TRANSPORTATION SECTOR; TRUCKS; AFRICA; DEMAND; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; ENERGY SOURCES; FLUIDS; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; GAS OILS; INDUSTRY; LIQUEFIED GASES; LIQUID FUELS; LIQUIDS; NATURAL GAS LIQUIDS; PETROLEUM; PETROLEUM FRACTIONS; SHORTAGES; VEHICLES 020700* -- Petroleum-- Economics, Industrial, & Business Aspects; 294002 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Petroleum; 290201 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Economics-- (1992-)

Citation Formats

Cain, M., and Yousif, M.A.R.. Economic development and the allocation of petroleum products in Sudan. United States: N. p., 1991. Web.
Cain, M., & Yousif, M.A.R.. Economic development and the allocation of petroleum products in Sudan. United States.
Cain, M., and Yousif, M.A.R.. 1991. "Economic development and the allocation of petroleum products in Sudan". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5342313,
title = {Economic development and the allocation of petroleum products in Sudan},
author = {Cain, M. and Yousif, M.A.R.},
abstractNote = {The Sudanese economy has been characterized in recent years by severe energy shortages which have affected all economic activity. More than 94% of the commercial energy is imported and the level of such imports is seriously limited by the current foreign exchange crisis. However, the problem is not just one of foreign exchange; there is also the problem of utilization of resources to avoid bottleneck problems of supply. The allocation of petroleum products in Sudan has had a severe effect on all aspects of economic life. The aim of this paper is to highlight the problem and to build a model to optimize the distribution of petroleum products in order to achieve at least a minimal supply in all regions. A large linear programming model has been developed and the solution indicates that current facilities should be able to satisfy 96% of the 1986 demand, about 30% more than the actual supply. Furthermore, with a little investment in storage facilities and extra trucks, the supply could satisfy total demand in the immediate future.},
doi = {},
journal = {Materials and Society; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 15:2,
place = {United States},
year = 1991,
month = 1
}
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